New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'

Random header image... Refresh for more!

Pee Wee Meets the Pollinators

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

The 6th book about Pee Wee the red wiggler worm

By Larraine Roulston
Castle Compost
2017

In this story, Nancy, Pee Wee and Reddy visit a rooftop garden and learn about the amazing work of pollinators. During their adventure they witness the birth of a monarch butterfly, follow a bee and meet a chorus of crickets. The story features composting, vermicomposting, compost tea and finished compost. It also contains poems, songs as well as additional notes to benefit teachers, parents and children.

[Read more →]

January 22, 2017   No Comments

Las Vegas embraces education about eco-living and access to fresh, healthy produce grown locally

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Vegas Roots Community Garden.

Urban Seed is a new farming facility in the first of eight phases aimed at building a 3-acre greenhouse

By Katie Visconti
Las Vegas Sun
Jan. 22, 2017 |

Excerpt:

PublicUs, Eat and Carson Kitchen incorporate farm-to-table finds. Gardens are being integrated into the curriculum at neighborhood schools through Green Our Planet. Chef Donald Lemperle and creative director Kelly Bennett of Vegenation are partnering with Vegas Roots Community Garden and Create a Change School Garden to change the way food can be served and enjoyed.

[Read more →]

January 22, 2017   No Comments

Galactic Farms Grew Food For Study On Space Settlers

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Snap peas growing from one of our experimental systems.

Hi SEAS 2015-16: We decided to build 4 small 30 gallon systems (the x-30s); 2 would use fish effluent and 2 would use human urine as a nutrient source.

Galactic Farms
Growing Food in Unique Palces
Dec 7, 2016

Excerpt:

Ultimately, Johnson and her crew were able to successfully grow peas and chard, although at low production levels. Although the systems were not as productive as they would have been if there were fewer limitations, the crew reported that working together on the project had value in terms of psychological benefits. The psychological effects of the astronaut diet were addressed in depth when the Hi-SEAS crew was interviewed for a recent podcast on Hidden Brain. They reported that much of their time is spent thinking about food because their options are so limited.

[Read more →]

January 22, 2017   No Comments

First Bite: How We Learn to Eat

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

Bee introduces us to people who can only eat food of a certain colour; toddlers who will eat nothing but hot dogs; doctors who have found radical new ways to help children eat vegetables

By Bee Wilson
Basic Books
Originally Harper Collins
Reprint edition (November 8, 2016)

We are not born knowing what to eat. We all have to learn it as children sitting expectantly at a table. For our diets to change, we need to relearn the food experiences that first shaped us.
Everyone starts drinking milk. After that it’s all up for grabs.

We are not born knowing what to eat; we each have to figure it out for ourselves. From childhood onwards, we learn how big a portion is and how sweet is too sweet. We learn to love broccoli or not. But how does this happen? What are the origins of taste? And once we acquire our food habits, can we ever change them for the better?

[Read more →]

January 21, 2017   No Comments

Brooklyn AirBnB: Stylish Room w/ Rooftop Community Garden & Lounge

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Enjoy the rooftop garden, lounge and hammock while the sunsets over the Manhattan skyline.

AirBnB
Brooklyn, New York

From the ad:

Bushwick is the new Williamsburg. Named the trendiest neighbourhood in Brooklyn, the area is filled with cool cafes, bars, restaurants, vintage stores and street-art. Enjoy the rooftop garden, lounge and hammock while the sunsets over the Manhattan skyline. The apartment is a 5 minute walk to the Dekalb L stop and Myrtle-Wyckoff M stop – a 15 min subway to Manhattan. Grab your morning coffee from Variety, dance the night away at House of Yes, enjoy pizza at OPS and browse L Train Vintage.

[Read more →]

January 21, 2017   No Comments

Philippines: Taguig aims for better environment, healthier lifestyle through urban farming

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Urban farming model at Tipas Elementary School /CREDIT: ilovetaguig.com / Manila Bulletin

To encourage residents to create their own “urban farms,” the City Agriculture Office held the first Gulayan Contest for Women on December 19, 2016.

Manila Bulletin
Jan 15, 2017

Excerpt:

Mayor Lani Cayetano said the city government intends to preserve at least 25 hectares of agricultural land. To achieve this goal, the city government is aggressively promoting urban farming and gardening. This goal is not prompted by nostalgia for an agricultural past, but for pragmatic reasons. The city government views urban farming not only as a source of income for its residents but as a way to promote a better environment and a healthier lifestyle.

The city’s urban gardening program favors organic farming where pesticides, fertilizers, genetically modified organisms, antibiotics, and growth hormones are not used on crops. Organically grown products are better for the environment and for a person’s health.

[Read more →]

January 21, 2017   No Comments

Bengaluru’s oldest urban farmer leads the way in sustainable living

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Anusuya Sharma’s terrace farm grows everything from leafy veggies to medicinal plants and herbs.

“The fresh chemical-free vegetables grown at home reduces my family’s carbon foot print, a core issue in global warming,” Anusuya says.

By Theja Ram
The News Minute
Jan 14, 2017

Excerpt:

“When I got married, I moved to Bombay. There were no plants in peoples’ homes and barely any space to live. I still nurtured a few plants on the balcony of our rented home. After 13 years, we moved to Hyderabad and the situation there was the opposite of Bombay. Almost every home there had a kitchen garden. I brought a few pots and began cultivating plants,” said Anusuya.

Anusuya and her family moved to Bengaluru in 1987 and it was at the city’s famous Lalbagh that the veteran farmer learned the intricacies of urban agriculture.

[Read more →]

January 20, 2017   No Comments

Many Urban Farmers Use Community Supported Agriculture (CSA)

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Portion of large infographic. See complete graphic here.

Infographic

By PartSelect
GHHERGICH&Co.
Oct 2016

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) is a concept that gained traction in the US in the 1990s, and has grown exponentially in popularity in the last few years. The concept of a CSA is beneficial on many levels, both for farms and for consumers. In a nutshell, CSA works to offer shares to members of their communities for a (usually quite reasonable) set price. In return, the customer receives a box of fresh, seasonal produce at regular intervals, usually weekly or monthly.

This arrangement is beneficial to farmers who work in an industry where it is normal for fluctuations in their business to occur. It gives farmers a baseline of support throughout the year, and can help them with cash flow ahead of their usual harvest.

[Read more →]

January 20, 2017   No Comments

Risks in urban rooftop agriculture: Assessing stakeholders’ perceptions to ensure efficient policymaking

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

Cartoonist: Jorodo.

Key stakeholders in Berlin and Barcelona perceive several risks associated with rooftop agriculture.

By Kathrin Spechta, Esther Sanyé-Mengualc
Environmental Science and Policy
March 2017

Abstract:

Rooftop agriculture (RA) is an innovative form of urban agriculture that takes advantage of unused urban spaces while promoting local food production. However, the implementation of RA projects is limited due to stakeholders’ perceived risks. Such risks should be addressed and minimized in policymaking processes to ensure the sustainable deployment of RA initiatives. This paper evaluates the risks that stakeholders perceive in RA and compares these perceptions with the currently available knowledge, including scientific literature, practices and market trends. Qualitative interviews with 56 stakeholders from Berlin and Barcelona were analyzed for this purpose.

[Read more →]

January 20, 2017   No Comments

Towards Regenerated and Productive Vacant Areas through Urban Horticulture: Lessons from Bologna, Italy

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

Pictures of urban horticulture projects in Bologna.

Six case studies representing this variety of vacant areas were identified and evaluated

By Daniela Gasperi, Giuseppina Pennisi, Niccolò Rizzati, Francesca Magrefi, Giovanni Bazzocchi, Umberto Mezzacapo, Monique Centrone Stefani, Esther Sanyé-Mengual, Francesco Orsini, and Giorgio Gianquinto
Sustainability Journal
December 2016

Abstract:

In recent years, urban agriculture has been asserting its relevance as part of a vibrant and diverse food system due to its small scale, its focus on nutrition, its contribution to food security, its employment opportunities, and its role in community building and social mobility. Urban agriculture may also be a tool to re-appropriate a range of abandoned or unused irregular spaces within the city, including flowerbeds, roundabouts, terraces, balconies and rooftops. Consistently, all spaces that present a lack of identity may be converted to urban agriculture areas and, more specifically, to urban horticulture as a way to strengthen resilience and sustainability.

[Read more →]

January 19, 2017   No Comments

Montreal’s urban agriculture pioneer Lufa Farms opens third rooftop greenhouse farm

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Lauren Rathmell looks at rainbow chard growing on the Lufa Farms rooftop greenhouse on Tuesday January 17, 2017. Pierre Obendrauf / Montreal Gazette

The newest, at 63,000 square feet more than double the size of the first, is the largest.

By Susan Schwartz
Montreal Gazette
Jan 18, 2017

Excerpt:

Last week Lufa Farms began to harvest produce from that greenhouse, set atop an industrial building in Anjou. The first week brought mega-sized radishes, watercress, Persian cress, arugula and spinach from among more than 40 varieties of greens started out there as seedlings in December; this week, tatsoi, red and green bok choy, Chinese cabbage, romaine and Boston lettuce were added to the mix. Next week there will be more.

[Read more →]

January 19, 2017   No Comments

Botanium – Grow Edible Greens

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

Even here in Sweden it’s easy, and you don’t need a special “growing light”. Just put your plant under a standard CFL, fluorescent lamp or LED.

By Rasmus Tretow
Co-founder
Botanic

From Kickstarter:

Botanium is a compact, easy and effortless way of growing. Its a hydroponic pot, which means it grows plants like chilies, herbs and tomatoes without soil. It waters the plants automatically. The result? Faster growth and no need to worry about over or under watering. Leave it for a month and get back to a healthy plant.

[Read more →]

January 18, 2017   No Comments

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg Spent Martin Luther King Day Building a Community Garden in Oak Cliff, Texas

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

Mark Zuckerberg: “Today I helped plant a garden with members of the Oak Cliff community in Dallas as part of their Day of Service honoring Martin Luther King Jr. Oak Cliff is a food desert, so the garden we worked on is going to be a source of fresh fruits and vegetables for the community.”

By Beth Rankin
Dallas Observer
Jan 16, 2017

Excerpt:

Zuckerberg spent the afternoon with the Commit Partnership, an organization that “helps drive student achievement throughout Dallas County from cradle to career by leveraging data and collaboration to measure what matters, identify effective practices and align community resources to spread what works.” Together with For Oak Cliff, an organization that seeks to provide education and opportunities for kids, Zuckerberg and Commit cleared the vacant lot to make room for a community garden.

[Read more →]

January 18, 2017   No Comments

Liberia: Sharing The Economic Benefits Of Urban Agriculture

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

Working on my nursery planted with cabbage and collard greens.

The Government of Liberia launched its urban and peri-urban farming program in 2011 to create jobs for the urban poor and to increase food production, especially in cities.

By Judoemue Kollie
Daily Observer
01/11/2017

Excerpt:

For me, realizing the skills I acquired in general agriculture from the Tumutu Agricultural Training Program, I returned to Monrovia in 2011 and began a garden project in my community in GSA Road, Paynesville, on a small plot of swamp land. On this plot of land, I plant different kinds of vegetables every year for additional income. Although I write on farming issues, my passion for agriculture is so overwhelming that I see it as a responsibility not only to write but to grow food for my family and the community.

I wake up every morning to visit my crops and do some work if needed before taking up other tasks. This year’s planting season, I am growing cabbage, collard greens, watermelons, water greens, peppers, bitter balls, eggplant and potato greens.

[Read more →]

January 18, 2017   No Comments

FAO Webinar: Urban and peri-urban agriculture: a key to livelihoods and resilience or a concern for sustainability?

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

A Webinar – Jan 20, 2017 – Water Footprint of Urban Agriculture: a first assessment in Rome

The FAO Technical Network on Sustainable Crop Production and Agroecology
Connect online here.

Agenda

10:00 – 10:05 am: Opening Mr. Guido Santini, Programme Coordinator for FAO Food for the Cities Programme.
10:05 – 10:45 am: Mrs. Anna Dalla Marta, DiSPAA – Department of Agrifood Production and Environmental Sciences – University of Florence. [See bio attached].
Mr. Orlando Cimino, Center for Policy and Bioeconomy – Council for Agricultural Research and Economics – CREA. [See bio attached].
10:45 – 11.30 am: Question and answer session

[Read more →]

January 17, 2017   No Comments