New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'

Random header image... Refresh for more!

A city girl’s guide to marrying a farmer

everyth

“Money can be the cause of a lot of problems in any kind of marriage, but in farming the money comes in fairly infrequently.”

By Lucie Bell
ABC Rural
July 21, 2014

Excerpt:

In Everything A Woman Needs To Know Before She Marries A Farmer, Joyce has compiled an A to Z collection of advice on topics which may be unfamiliar to women coming from a city background.

“It’s not like marrying a plumber, or a carpenter or a lawyer in the city, it comes with baggage.

“I thought there were a lot of pitfalls that women like me can find out about later, that can cause a lot of tears and can actually put a stress on the relationship.

[Read more →]

July 29, 2014   No Comments

How Rooftop Farms Yield 20 Times More Produce Than Traditional Farms

Brooklyn-based Gotham Greens builds greenhouses on urban rooftops.

By Graham Flanagan
Business Insider Australia
July 22, 2014

Excerpt:

As more and more people move into cities, the demand for access to fresher, more nutritious foods continues to rise.

Brooklyn-based Gotham Greens builds greenhouses on urban rooftops. Inside the greenhouses, the company grows vegetables that don’t have to make the long journey most food makes from rural farms to cities.

In one location, the food only has to go as far as the Whole Foods directly below it.

[Read more →]

July 29, 2014   No Comments

‘In Da Garden’ – Rap video protest against CP Railway threatening Vancouver gardens

Lyrics by Gabriel

Go go go go go
Go CP, It’s your railway,
We going to garden like its our railway
We going to eat brocolli like its our railway
and you know we don’t give a **** it’s not your railway!

[Read more →]

July 29, 2014   No Comments

3rd Annual Seoul Urban Agriculture Conference in Seoul, South Korea – Recap

recap

The 3rd Annual Seoul Urban Agriculture Conference was held 29-31 May 2014 at the Seoul City Hall. This year’s theme was “Urban Agriculture and the Food Revolution”.

Submitted by Will Nichols
Professor, Hanyang University
Seoul, South Korea
July 2014

Excerpt:

The Seoul metropolitan area is home to around 20 million people and is the capital of South Korea. South Korea enjoys a high standard of living and is known for its high-tech industries. However, like most industrialized countries, focus is now shifting to long-term sustainability of a high quality of life. The city of Seoul in recent years has seen a blossoming of new initiatives for greening the city environment, promoting healthy and local food systems and building strong communities. This conference was launched to bring together a diverse group of practitioners to discuss recent progress and future needs for the development of the urban agriculture to promote these initiatives.

[Read more →]

July 28, 2014   No Comments

An oasis in the food desert: Fresh Future Farm aims to revitalize North Charleston, S. Carolina

leland
The planned Fresh Future Farm will include beehives, a chicken coop, composting and areas for tours and demonstrations in addition to more traditional crops, said Germaine Jenkins, a master gardener. Provided/Fresh Future Farm.

“Local foods and community gardens are part of the solution to that, but they’re just part of it,” he said. “They’ve got to make changes in lifestyle – people taking control of their own cooking, really.”

By Katie West
The Post and Courier
Jul 20 2014

Excerpt:

The idea is simple. Jenkins, a certified master gardener, wants to establish a nonprofit urban farm on 0.75 acres of the grounds of the former Chicora Elementary School on Success Street. It would be more than just a place to grow and buy fruits and vegetables: It would be an entire community food operation, with an on-site store to sell produce, toiletries and other groceries. School groups and residents could come to tour the facilities or take classes on farming, cooking and the food industry, and underemployed people in the area could be trained on the skills they’d need to work on the farm or start

[Read more →]

July 28, 2014   No Comments

Refugees from Syrian attacks fight starvation with food gardens

refug
Yarmouk residents (in Damascus) transform the spaces between buildings into gardens that can produce vegetables.

Accused of using starvation as a weapon of war, the Syrian government continues to besiege areas across the country, forcing civilians to find new ways to make ends meet.

By Olivia Alabaster
The Daily Star
July 12, 2014

Excerpt:

In Yarmouk (in Damascus), the activist said that people mostly grow cucumbers, tomatoes, eggplant and zucchini, but even then people do not have enough to eat, and there is no bread – wheat being too difficult to grow, and requiring machines which in turn rely on fuel, a scarcity, and lots of open space.

But, Hevi said, the ability to produce one’s own food was important for people in these areas. While the U.N. occasionally delivers food baskets to the area, which they refer to as “food security,” being able to grow one’s own food is much more sustainable and offers “food sovereignty.”

Growing one’s own food “makes sense on so many levels,” said Hevi, who is German-Iraqi. “You can produce your own food, and you can also sell it, so you can refinance some of the project.”

[Read more →]

July 28, 2014   No Comments

Spokane’s Urban farm ordinance will incur costs to city

spoakneSpokane urban farm.

People wanting to keep goats, sheep or small pigs in the city have to be certified through a class by Washington State University’s Spokane County Extension service.

Mike Prager
The Spokesman-Review
July 19, 2014

Excerpt:

Spokane’s new urban farming ordinance that allows for the keeping of small farm animals is likely to cost the city extra money for animal control services.

The director of the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service has outlined a series of charges for the extra work of answering farm animal welfare calls and noise and odor complaints involving goats, sheep, small pigs or fowl.

[Read more →]

July 27, 2014   No Comments

Community center in Petersburg, Virginia will see new life as an urban farm

new1.5Duron Chavis, a Virginia State University graduate, is the project director of the community garden, which is funded by a $1.5 million federal grant.

$1.5 million federal grant, is a collaboration with Virginia State University faculty

By Leah Small
Progress
July 21, 2014

Excerpt:

Petersburg residents will have access to an array of peppers, tomatoes and other vegetables. Fresh tilapia will also be grown with the help of indoor aquaponic units. Aquaponics involves raising fish and plants together. The fish waste becomes plant fertilizer and the water is filtered by the plants. Vegetables will be grown via hydroponics, in which plants are grown without soil in water, with additional nutrients.

The hydroponic and aquaponic growing units will be placed in the community center’s gymnasium. Other parts of the building will be used for nutrition classes and community outreach efforts.

[Read more →]

July 27, 2014   No Comments

Food-Producing Landscapes: Principles of Design

foodprod

Food producing landscapes are more controversial than your typical landscape project.

By Brian Barth
Land 8
July 17, 2014

Excerpt:

1) Use hardscape features to create aesthetic definition.

The clean lines of paths, patios, fences, raised beds, retaining walls, arbors, trellises and pergolas can all be used to create order out what can sometimes be a chaotic and cluttered plantscape. Fruit trees espaliered along a rigid structure (i.e. wood or wires) or a turning a hillside into a terraced vineyard are examples.

[Read more →]

July 26, 2014   No Comments

Philadelphia Urban Creators enact their bold plan to educate, energize, empower and unite

grid

“This one thing, food, can literally cure every last one of the intangible crises,” Kayembe says. “Violence, hunger, health—people are violent because they’re hungry.

By Molly O’Neill
Grid Magazine
July 2014

Excerpt:

A chain-link fence surrounds the lot where a warehouse once stood. Inside, a graffiti mural painted over a brick wall proclaims the farm’s name, Life Do Grow. This property, at 11th and Dakota Streets, is the beating heart of the Philadelphia Urban Creators (PUC), a nonprofit organization striving to enrich the lives of North Philadelphia residents through urban agriculture.

It’s an unexpected burst of life in the middle of the neighborhood.

[Read more →]

July 26, 2014   No Comments

Urban Agriculture in Boston: Permits and Approvals Needed to Start Your Less than One Acre Ground-Level Farm

urbbost

Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation – Harvard Law School

Food Law & Policy,
July 17, 2014
(Must see. Mike)

The Food Law and Policy Clinic (FLPC) is excited to announce the publication of its guide, Urban Agriculture in Boston: Permits and Approvals Needed to Start Your Less than One Acre Ground-Level Farm. The guide to establishing ground-level farms smaller than one acre is the first in a series of guides that spell out the processes urban farmers in Boston will need to go through in order to start their operations in the City.

[Read more →]

July 26, 2014   No Comments

New York City Backyards Welcome Chickens and Bees

nyfrms
Photo by Ángel Franco/The New York Times. Link to slideshow.

Heard on the Street: E-I-E-I-O

By Ronda Kaysen
New York Times
July 25, 2014

Excerpt:

There is no data tracking how many New Yorkers are tilling the earth — but it’s clear which way the wind is blowing. Last year, 5,000 New Yorkers attended educational workshops led by the New York City Compost Project, a program created in 1993. More than 250 honeybee hives are registered with the city, but beekeepers like Andrew Coté, the founder of the New York City Beekeepers Association, suspect the real number is higher. His association has 480 members, up from 25 in 2007.

[Read more →]

July 25, 2014   No Comments

Challenges of the City Chicken in New York

Video story

By Sofia Perpetua
New York Times
July 25th, 2014

Robert McMinn, an urban homesteader in New York City, worked to be sure his neighbors and landlords were happy with his chickens.

Link.

July 25, 2014   No Comments

Proposed urban farm at the city’s former St. Clair Village public housing site in Pittsbugh

greenClick on image for larger file.

One day be one of the coun­try’s larg­est ur­ban farms

By Diana Nelson Jones
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
July 14, 2014

Excerpts:

The Hill­top Al­liance is work­ing with Grow Pitts­burgh, the Penn State Co­op­er­a­tive Ex­ten­sion and the Al­le­gheny Land Trust to make that hap­pen. The al­li­ance is a non­profit um­brella whose staff or­ga­nizes proj­ects with ad­vo­cates from or­ga­ni­za­tions in nine south­ern neigh­bor­hoods.

The St. Clair Vil­lage pub­lic hous­ing site, which con­tained 465 units at its peak, was fully de­mol­ished by 2010. What’s left of the neigh­bor­hood — 209 peo­ple in pri­vately owned homes — needs ev­ery­thing a farm would pro­vide: fresh food, a chance for en­ter­prise, and youth train­ing and ed­u­ca­tion.

[Read more →]

July 24, 2014   No Comments

Complaints low one year after Lakewood, Colorado expands urban ag

goatkid
Matt Post holds his daughter, Morgan, 9 months, on the back of Daisy the goat in the backyard of their home in Lakewood. City Council passed an ordinance allowing backyard chickens and goats one year ago. (Seth McConnell, YourHub)

Since April 2013, the city has issued 52 permits for hens, eight for goats, seven for ducks and 26 for beekeeping on residential lots 6,000 square feet or smaller.

By Austin Briggs
Denver Post
07/17/2014

Excerpt:

From April 2013 through June 2014, there have been five complaints on bees, 20 for chickens and one on dwarf goats.

“There has not been an uptick in complaints,” said city planner Paul Rice.

“I’ve been surprised, but there has yet to be any complaints in my ward,” Councilman Paul agreed.

[Read more →]

July 24, 2014   No Comments