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The Urban Agricultural Movement in Canada: A Comparative Analysis of Montréal and Vancouver

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montrealFigure 7: Modeling the Initiation of Urban Agriculture based on Vancouver and Montréal Case Studies

The Urban Agricultural Movement in Canada: A Comparative Analysis of Montréal and Vancouver

By Chandal Nolasco da Silva
Email: chandal.nds@gmail.com
A research essay submitted to the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, 16,000 words
Carleton University 2009

1. Introduction

Urban agriculture is a term used to describe both private and public agricultural activities that take place in urban and peri-urban areas. While regional examples practice urban agriculture differently, each will help to increase food security. Urban agriculture has the potential to increase a region’s food security by providing a local food supply system and successful examples of this situation have been documented in the Canadian cities of Montréal and Vancouver.

By documenting the birth of the urban agricultural movements in Montréal and Vancouver, this research has sought to understand how modern Canadian cities can adopt local food systems.

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December 1, 2009   Comments Off on The Urban Agricultural Movement in Canada: A Comparative Analysis of Montréal and Vancouver

Beyond urban agriculture and farm land preservation

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MarkJanineMark Holland, Janine de la Salle

Beyond urban agriculture and farm land preservation

by Janine de la Salle and Mark Holland
November 25, 2009
CITinfoResource

Food and agriculture have finally caught the attention of the planning and other professions – perhaps for the first time in modern history. At least that’s what the 2009 summer issue of Plan Canada (Vol 49: No. 2) suggests.

This is a good thing. It shows that, as a profession, we are in a receptive mode, constantly learning how to balance the tools we have right now with the need to develop new ways to think about problems and their solutions. For example, urban agriculture and the protection of farmland are priority issues; but other opportunities and approaches are beginning to present themselves, and we must be quick to add them to the “food planning toolbox.”

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December 1, 2009   Comments Off on Beyond urban agriculture and farm land preservation