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World War II Texaco advertisement

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Your car – like your Victory Garden – is a national asset these days. So care for it wisely! Spare it excessive wear with stem-to-stern Marfak chassis lubrication.

January 5, 2010   Comments Off on World War II Texaco advertisement

How one farm got off the ground in Sarasota, Florida

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sarasotaPhoto by E. SKYLAR LITHERLAND. Vincent Dessberg stands at his rooftop hydroponic farm near downtown Sarasota, where he is growing fruits and vegetables. His lettuce is selling at the Sarasota Downtown Farmer’s Market. With about 6,000 plants, this new small farm is by far the most urban in the county.

By Kate Spinner
Herald Tribune
January 4, 2010

SARASOTA – In an industrial park about a mile from Main Street, mechanics repair cars, cleaners launder draperies and Vincent Dessberg grows crops on the roof of his old glass shop.

Dessberg used to fuse glass into colorful windows. But after the economic downturn he turned from the kiln, seeing better opportunity on his 3,000 square-foot roof.

“Nobody needs glass. Everybody needs to eat,” he said.

His lettuce is selling at the Sarasota Downtown Farmer’s Market. Other fruits and vegetables — cauliflower, okra, goji berries — are bound for dinner plates at some of the city’s best restaurants.

With about 6,000 plants, this new small farm is by far the most urban in the county. Crops grow vertically in 180 hydroponic planters that stand about six feet tall.

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January 5, 2010   Comments Off on How one farm got off the ground in Sarasota, Florida

UK Grow your own food revolution plans to seed unused land

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UKrevolThe government plans a landbank to pinpoint unused plots where communities can grow their own food. Photograph: David Levene

Ministers consider temporary allotments scheme?Fruit and veg plots part of strategy to cut reliance on imports

By James Meikle
guardian.co.uk,
4 January 2010

The government plans to launch a “grow your own” revolution by encouraging people to set up temporary allotments or community gardens on land awaiting development or other permanent use.

It aims to develop a “meanwhile” lease to formalise such arrangements between landowners and voluntary groups and is considering establishing a “land bank” to broker better links and ensure plots are not left idle.

Ministers believe the move could foster community spirit and skills as well as improve physical and mental health.

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January 5, 2010   Comments Off on UK Grow your own food revolution plans to seed unused land