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The Buzz About Big City Beekeepers

beeLAKirk Anderson addresses members of Backward Beekeepers, an organization in Los Angeles that meets monthly to swap stories about urban beekeeping. Photo: Ben Murray

TakePart looks at city beekeepers

By Salvatore Cardoni
TakePart Social Action Network
March 30, 2010

Excerpt:

It’s a resplendent Saturday afternoon in Los Angeles, that rare smog-free day. You decide to charbroil some burgers for lunch. You creek open the lid of your backyard grill and…bzzZZZzzzz! A bee-hive! In ten seconds flat, you’ve hi-tailed it back into the house, slammed the door, and Googled “exterminator.”

Best to kill those sons-a-beeswax before they swarm, right? Wrong!

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March 30, 2010   Comments Off on The Buzz About Big City Beekeepers

Agriculture 2.0 Silicon Valley – venture capitalists listen to city farmers

ag2March 24, 2010. Agriculture 2.0 Silicon Valley, co-hosted by NewSeed Advisors, US Venture Partners, and SPIN Farming, brought together hundreds of growers, entrepreneurs, investors, retailers, industry experts, and journalists, all united by the common goal of driving the growth of sustainable agriculture and healthful food systems.

Silicon Valley investors place bets on sustainable ag – big money on small ag – Event held on March 24

By Todd Woody
Grist
26 March 2010

Excerpts:

“We want to create an opportunity for a market, not a movement,” said Roxanne Christensen of SPIN Farming, which promotes the creation of urban microfarms.

Of course, the killer app would be to power urban microfarms with renewable energy, noted Mike Yohay, founder of Cityscape Farms, a San Francisco startup developing rooftop greenhouses that use hydroponics and aquaponics technology to grow food without soil and fertilize it with fish waste.

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March 30, 2010   1 Comment

Health benefits of ‘grow your own’ food in urban areas: implications for contaminated land risk assessment and risk management?

allotment

Implications for contaminated land risk assessment and risk management?

By Jonathan R Leake 1 , Andrew Adam-Bradford 2 and Janette E Rigby 3
1 Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK
2 Department of Geography, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK
3 National Centre for Geocomputation, National University of Ireland Maynooth, Co. Kildare, Ireland
Environmental Health
Published: 21 December 2009

Excerpts:

Abstract

Compelling evidence of major health benefits of fruit and vegetable consumption, physical activity, and outdoor interaction with ‘greenspace’ have emerged in the past decade – all of which combine to give major potential health benefits from ‘grow-your-own’ (GYO) in urban areas. However, neither current risk assessment models nor risk management strategies for GYO in allotments and gardens give any consideration to these health benefits, despite their potential often to more than fully compensate the risks. Although urban environments are more contaminated by heavy metals, arsenic, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and dioxins than most rural agricultural areas, evidence is lacking for adverse health outcomes of GYO in UK urban areas.

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March 30, 2010   Comments Off on Health benefits of ‘grow your own’ food in urban areas: implications for contaminated land risk assessment and risk management?

“Allegheny Grows” Initiative to Promote Urban Farming

braddockAllegheny Grows is an outgrowth of the County’s successful partnership with Grow Pittsburgh to create the Braddock Urban Farm, which turned eight vacant lots in the heart of the borough into a 20,000 square-foot farm with 90 raised beds.

Onorato Launches “Allegheny Grows” Initiative to Promote Urban Farming and Community Gardening

March 25, 2010

Excerpt:

PITTSBURGH — Allegheny County Executive Dan Onorato today launched “Allegheny Grows,” a new initiative to encourage urban farming and community gardening on vacant lots and blighted properties. Allegheny Grows will offer startup materials, as well as technical and educational assistance to municipalities that show significant interest in developing urban farms and community gardens.

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March 30, 2010   1 Comment