New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
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Suitcase urban farming

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suitcase

UrbanBuds

By Design Academy Eindhoven Graduation Project

The design of this project involves the metaphor of a suitcase as a symbol of cultural background. We all are use to saying that wherever we move, we bring with us our backpack of culture, background… our so-called ‘bag of experiences’. The design takes influence from this picture and it transforms it into the product of movable, soil-filled suitcases.

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May 14, 2010   Comments Off on Suitcase urban farming

Future farmers transplanted from cities and suburbs

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sacrabeeBenjamin Woods weeds between carrots and sugar peas at Mama Earth Farm, which he runs with his wife, Mary, and mother, Shirley, in Somerset, near Placerville. Benjamin got his start at an “urban agriculture center” in Santa Barbara; Mary liked organic food as a Sacramento college student. Photo by Paul Kitagaki Jr.

Cities and suburbs now supply young recruits to agriculture

By Carlos Alcalá
The Sacramento Bee
Apr. 20, 2010

Excerpt:

The refrain about young people and agriculture used to be, “How ya gonna keep ’em down on the farm?”

City attractions were deemed too strong for the simple life to compete for the attention of young rural adults.

That longtime story is reversing.

Cities and suburbs now supply young recruits to agriculture, primarily to small and organic farms, and the trend is playing out in El Dorado County. Melinda Lundgren, 29, first came to agriculture as a college student at Northeastern University in Boston.

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May 14, 2010   Comments Off on Future farmers transplanted from cities and suburbs

Six Stories Above Queens, a Fine Spot for a Little Farming

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queensSoil mix was hoisted on Thursday to a 40,000-square-foot roof where tomatoes, peppers and greens will soon be growing in Long Island City, Queens. Photo by Nicole Bengiveno.

Brooklyn Grange starts their farm

By Diane Cardwell
New York Times
May 13, 2010

Excerpt:

The stretch of Northern Boulevard near 36th Street in Long Island City, Queens, is about as far from bucolic as it gets: Old industrial buildings loom, traffic whizzes by, car dealerships line the street. Off in the distance, Manhattan’s skyscrapers glitter, the trains rumble, and the closest thing to a meadow is a small patch of plants the Parks Department has named Triangle 37.

But six stories up, on the roof of one of those old buildings, an ambitious farm began to take shape on Thursday. Called Brooklyn Grange — the group behind it settled on the name before they settled on their borough — it will grow tomatoes, peppers, eggplants and leafy greens amid the air-conditioning units and water tower perched on the 40,000-square foot-roof.

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May 14, 2010   Comments Off on Six Stories Above Queens, a Fine Spot for a Little Farming

Graphic novel ‘Sword of My Mouth’ set in an imaginary burned-out Detroit where some survive by urban farming

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freeky

The Freaky Farmstead

A stand-alone story continuing on from the acclaimed graphic novel Therefore Repent!, Sword of My Mouth moves the focus from Chicago, under siege by angels with machine guns, to the urban prairie of Detroit. Folks in the D have banded together to turn land with burned-out crackhouses into farming tracts, and seem to be on a road to self-sufficiency… until Famine rides into town.

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May 14, 2010   Comments Off on Graphic novel ‘Sword of My Mouth’ set in an imaginary burned-out Detroit where some survive by urban farming

Fish Are Jumping—Off Assembly Line

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fishnetFor a few weekends this spring, perch-lovers lined up to buy whole fish for $5 each. It takes three or four perch to get a pound of fillet. More fish should be big enough to sell by late summer. Photo by Jon Lowenstein. See more with the article.

Perch, Loved in Milwaukee but Decimated in Lake Michigan, Find New Life in an Old Factory; On the Side: Fresh Produce

By Joe Barrett
Wall Street Journal
May 14, 2010

Excerpt:

MILWAUKEE—Josh Fraundorf remembers when yellow perch were so plentiful in Lake Michigan that people pulled out all they could eat with just a bamboo pole and some worms.

Now, they have to come to places like this old factory south of downtown.

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May 14, 2010   Comments Off on Fish Are Jumping—Off Assembly Line

Seeds of Urban Agriculture Taking Root in San Francisco

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free
Free Farm

By Chris Carlsson
Nowtopia
May 13, 2010

From a meeting named Circle The Food Wagons: Local Food Economies with Hayes Valley Farm, Little City Gardens, The Free Farm, and Far West Fungi from The Heart of the City Farmers’ Market.

Excerpt:

Next up was the Free Farm, represented by Lauren Anderson and Case Garver, which is a new garden farm on an empty sand lot at Eddy and Gough where an old Lutheran Church burned down in 1995. After fifteen years of lying fallow and gathering garbage and debris, the collaborative effort of several non-profit organizations (including Lauren’s Produce to the People), community groups and individuals got permission from the Lutheran Church to begin an organic farm there.

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May 14, 2010   Comments Off on Seeds of Urban Agriculture Taking Root in San Francisco