New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
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The real dirt: City squashes front yard veggie plot

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Sylvie Oliveira with kids and a letter from the City of Toronto forbidding her vegetable garden in front of her house on city property.

A terse missive demanding that they remove all the vegetable plants

By Sonia Day
Toronto Star
October 22, 2010

Excerpt:

What constitutes a “natural” garden to the City of Toronto?

Grass, apparently. Just grass. Plus, perhaps a few flowers. But certainly not vegetables.

That’s what Sylvie and Vic Oliveira discovered this summer after they turned their Bloor West Village front yard into a vegetable garden.

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October 22, 2010   Comments Off on The real dirt: City squashes front yard veggie plot

Autumn issue of Landscape starts out in post-industrial Detroit with the rise of urban agriculture

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“Our cover feature this issue looks at the increasing popularity of community growing and city farms, and asks what it would take to make urban agriculture an integral part of the future urban landscape.”

Landscape, the Journal of the Landscape Institute

Introductory paragraph:

“After the failure of millions of dollars worth of schemes to rejuvenate the motor industry in Detroit, government and business leaders are starting to see the prospect of a second chance as residents find hope in returning to the arable land that spawned the city. Cuba reacted similarly following the collapse of trade relations with the Soviet bloc in 1989–90 and, by 2002, had 14,000 hectares of city farms. They are extreme cases yet typical of the way that the urban agriculture movement is emerging at a grassroots level across the US and globally.

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October 22, 2010   Comments Off on Autumn issue of Landscape starts out in post-industrial Detroit with the rise of urban agriculture

In the monastery archives of the Friar’s Minor in Dubrovnik, Croatia

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Photo credits: Barbara Ozimec, Srdjan Todorovic

Scripts in Bloom: Uncovering Gardens of the Past

By Barbara Ozimec
Soiled and Seeded Magazine
Cultivating a Garden Culture
Issue 1, Autumn 2010

Barbara Ozimec is Executive Director of Soiled and Seeded Natural Heritage Explorations. She has only just begun her research on the botanical manuscripts in the Friar’s Minor collection. She hopes to track the journey of research and discovery through a series of media projects.

Excerpt:

Rich in text, these pages document the extensive use of plants as healing agents and provide detailed accounts of drug manufacture. The books, largely composed in the 17th and 18th century, include plant registers of hundreds of plant names, written in both Italian and Croatian as well as manuals that collectively provide over 1000 pharmaceutical recipes.

The Friar’s Minor constructed in the 14th century was, like many European monasteries by the Middle Ages, equipped with a hospital and pharmacy. Initially, tending to ailing brothers, the monks extended their care to the general public. In many cities, the only source of treatment in the time of illness was the monastic hospital.

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October 22, 2010   Comments Off on In the monastery archives of the Friar’s Minor in Dubrovnik, Croatia

Kinsman Neighborhood to be Site of Largest Urban Agriculture District in the U.S.

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The Urban Agriculture Innovation Zone will reuse 28 acres of land in Cleveland’s ward 5 into farmland

By Eugene McCormick
Cleveland Leader
10/21/2010

Twenty-eight acres of under-utilized and vacant land in the Kinsman neighborhood will soon become the largest urban agriculture district in the U.S. Ward 5 Councilwoman Phyllis Cleveland; Mayor Frank Jackson; Burten, Bell, Carr Development, Inc; The Ohio State University Extension; representatives from Ohio Governor Ted Strickland’s office; and representatives from the U.S. Department of Agriculture will take part in an announcement at Otter Park, E. 83rd Street and Gill Avenue tomorrow announcing the plans.

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October 22, 2010   1 Comment