New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
Random header image... Refresh for more!

Potential of urban agriculture in Bangladesh

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Photo: Star

In the near future, urban and semi-urban agriculture will be accepted and implemented as a major intervention in food security and social security programmes

By Syed Anwarul Haque
The writer is a former Professor of Soil Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University.
The Daily Star
May 27, 2011

Excerpt:

Floriculture is an important aspect of Dhaka daily life. Every day there are marriages, birthday parties, meetings etc. where flowers are essential to grace the occasion. Growing markets have also sprung up in different corners of the city to cater the needs of the city dwellers. It creates a lot of job opportunities for the hither unemployed people and brings money to improve their livelihood.

To meet the demand of the huge population of Dhaka, a vast quantity of fruits is needed. To meet the demand and earn money out of selling fruits, fruit plantations have developed in a small scale in the city as well as in the periphery in a scattered way.

[Read more →]

May 27, 2011   Comments Off on Potential of urban agriculture in Bangladesh

Pedal power takes Kelowna urban farmer’s crops to market

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+


Curtis Stone SHAW TV interview, May 24th 2011.

“In any other system of agriculture, profits are totally diluted through all the machinery, mortgage and lease payments that you have, plus all your transportation costs.”

By Adrian Nieoczym
Globe and Mail
May. 26, 2011

Excerpt:

Kelowna, BC. Mr. Stone describes himself as a “pedal-powered urban farmer.” Now in his second year, he works three-quarters of an acre spread between six plots located in other people’s backyards. “With the land that I’m running now, I could feed about 120 families,” he said.

A former musician who had not even gardened before starting his business, Mr. Stone is quickly emerging as a leader in the growing urban agriculture movement known as SPIN (small-plot intensive) farming. This past winter, he delivered paid workshops in California and B.C., sharing his techniques with other would-be urban farmers. He recently accepted a gig to do the same next year in India.

[Read more →]

May 27, 2011   Comments Off on Pedal power takes Kelowna urban farmer’s crops to market