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In 1797 Food Gardens Helped the Poor Stay out of the Workhouse

Britton Abbot’s cottage garden near the town of Tadcaster, England, a productive quarter of an acre

Excerpts from An account of a cottage and garden near Tadcaster, by Thomas Bernard, 1797

The land required for each cottage and garden, need not be more than a rood (quarter acre); the value of which would bear no possible comparison to that of the industry to be employed upon it. The quarter of an acre that Britton Abbot inclosed, was not worth a shilling a year. It now contains a good house and a garden, abounding in fruit, vegetables, and almost everything that constitutes the wealth of the cottager. In such inclosures, the benefits to the country, and to the individuals of the parish, would far surpass and petty sacrifice of land to be required. “Five unsightly unprofitable acres of waste ground would afford habitation and comfort to twenty such families as Britton Abbot’s.”

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January 2, 2012   Comments Off on In 1797 Food Gardens Helped the Poor Stay out of the Workhouse