New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
Random header image... Refresh for more!

Will Allen’s new book

Forbes: The New Green Revolution: A Vision For Small-Scale Urban Farming

The Good Food Revolution: Growing Healthy Food, People, and Communities
Gotham Books
Publication Date: May 10, 2012

Excerpt from Forbes magazine:

On three city acres in the heart of an inner-city Milwaukee neighborhood, we grow enough food year-round in our greenhouses to feed ten thousand people. At our facility five blocks from Wisconsin’s largest public housing project, we are taking city waste that would otherwise end up in a landfill-beer mash, food waste, coffee grinds-and composting it to create healthy soil. We are feeding this compost to millions of worms, who create a natural fertilizer. We are using this rich soil to grow intensively more than 100 varieties of vegetables. We are also raising 100,000 fish in “aquaponics” systems that resemble natural streams.

[Read more →]

May 12, 2012   1 Comment

Interview: Rob Stephenson on Capturing the Farms of New York City


Hell’s Kitchen Rooftop Farm, Manhattan 2011. Photo by Rob Stephenson.

New York photographer Rob Stephenson spent last year documenting farms in New York City.

By Ariella Cohen
Next American City
05/10/2012

Excerpt:

Whether on a Manhattan rooftop or in an abandoned lot in the Bronx, these experiments in urban agriculture hold the power to change the way the city feeds itself. His lush, large-format photographs tell the story of this growing movement to farm the five boroughs. We interviewed Stephenson about his series, From Roof to Table,which is now on display at The Storefront for Urban Innovation.

Next American City: What inspired you to create this series?

[Read more →]

May 12, 2012   Comments Off on Interview: Rob Stephenson on Capturing the Farms of New York City

Pilot Urban Agricultural Zoning Program in Boston Serves as Model for Integration of Farming into City Life

The city selected two abandoned lots in Dorchester, an ethnically diverse neighborhood known as a food desert.

By Noelle Swan
Seedstock
May 10, 2012

Excerpt:

Aside from a little referenced law dating back to the 19th century allowing public grazing for sheep and cattle on Boston Common, Boston zoning laws make no mention of agriculture. In absence of zoning permissions, most agricultural activities are in effect forbidden. “That’s not to say that the city is out there policing people with vegetable gardens,” says Tad Read, project manager of the Urban Agricultural Zoning at the Boston Redevelopment Authority. He adds that without a legal support to lean on, farmers can be penalized if neighbors file nuisance complaints, such as odors from compost and manure application, or squawking of hens laying eggs each morning.

[Read more →]

May 12, 2012   Comments Off on Pilot Urban Agricultural Zoning Program in Boston Serves as Model for Integration of Farming into City Life