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Will Allen’s new book


Forbes: The New Green Revolution: A Vision For Small-Scale Urban Farming

The Good Food Revolution: Growing Healthy Food, People, and Communities
Gotham Books
Publication Date: May 10, 2012

Excerpt from Forbes magazine:

On three city acres in the heart of an inner-city Milwaukee neighborhood, we grow enough food year-round in our greenhouses to feed ten thousand people. At our facility five blocks from Wisconsin’s largest public housing project, we are taking city waste that would otherwise end up in a landfill-beer mash, food waste, coffee grinds-and composting it to create healthy soil. We are feeding this compost to millions of worms, who create a natural fertilizer. We are using this rich soil to grow intensively more than 100 varieties of vegetables. We are also raising 100,000 fish in “aquaponics” systems that resemble natural streams.




With the help of a broad solar array and a bio-digester, we are also slowly eliminating our reliance on fossil fuel.

Most private investment and government support for agriculture in the past century went to making large-scale agriculture more “efficient.” I think our energies in this century should be devoted instead to making small-scale farming economically sustainable.

See Forbes article here.

See the book on Amazon here.

See “Urban Farming Pioneer Will Allen is Leading a Food Revolution” here.

1 comment

1 Walter Haugen { 05.28.12 at 10:21 am }

Your advertising is misleading. Your comment is: “On three city acres in the heart of an inner-city Milwaukee neighborhood, we grow enough food year-round in our greenhouses to feed ten thousand people.” At 2500 kilocalories per person per day, 10,000 people consume 9.125 billion kilocalories per year. Over three acres, that would be 3.04 billion kilocalories produced per acre. This is not a credible claim because it is 1,000 times more kilocalories produced per acre than wheat. Even though you are growing intensively, I doubt that hydroponics and aquaculture can produce food on this scale.

If you mean that you provide SOME food for 10,000 different people over the course of a year, you should say so.