New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
Random header image... Refresh for more!

NPR: Science Friday – From Rooftops And Abandoned Lots, An Urban Harvest


Country farm and city skyscrape.

From rooftop apiaries in Paris to a vegetable-and-chicken farm in Philadelphia, agriculture has come to the city. Urban farmer Mary Seton Corboy and food writer Jennifer Cockrall-King talk about the future of food in the city. Plus, Tama Matsuoka Wong gives tasty tips for eating garden weeds.

By Ira Flatow, Host
NPR
May 18, 2012

Excerpt:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I’m Ira Flatow. If you live in a big city, there’s no shortage of places to buy groceries. You’ve got your supermarkets, your delis, your farmers markets, your sidewalk fruit stands. It seems like a limitless supply of food, right? But if you stop the delivery trucks, experts say a city’s food would run out in just three days.

So to be on the safe side, why not grow more food in the city instead of trucking it in from someplace else, some other country, some other hemisphere? That’s what’s on my next guest’s suggestion list in her new book “Food and the City: Urban Agriculture and the New Food Revolution.”

And urban agriculture is not just about fruits and veggies. People are raising chickens and pigs in cities, too. They’re farming fish. They’re even making honey on rooftops. And if urban farming is not for you, how about eating the greens already growing wild, the weeds in your yard? That’s right, try frying up some dandelion heads for a delicious snack, adding the leaves themselves to a salad.

One of my next guests is a professional forager, and she has some tips and recipes for us.

Read and listen to the story here.