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250,000 Bees Find A Home Atop the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in Manhattan

Until 2010, beekeeping was illegal in New York City

By Charley Cameron,
Inhabitat New York City
06/30/12

Excerpts:

The 20th floor of New York’s Waldorf-Astoria now accommodates some rather unusual residents — around 250,000 bees living on the roof of the prestigious hotel. Transported to their new midtown Manhattan digs by a Lincoln Towncar, the pollinating inhabitants of the six beehives were placed there to support the PlaNYC initiative to plant 1,000,000 new trees over the next decade. The hotel will benefit directly too, with their own in-house supply of sustainable honey!

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July 4, 2012   Comments Off on 250,000 Bees Find A Home Atop the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in Manhattan

Revolutionary Plots: Urban agriculture is producing a lot more than food


Rebecca Solnit is the author of twelve books including this essay.

Urban agriculture: upscale fetish or revolution in the making? It depends in part on what you hope to cultivate.

By Rebecca Solnit
Orion Magazine
July/August issue
Major 5200 word article.

Rebecca Solnit is the author of twelve books. She is a journalist, essayist, environmentalist, historian, and art critic; she is a contributing editor to Harper’s, a columnist for the environmental magazine Orion, and a regular contributor to Tomdispatch.com and the Nation; she’s also written for, among other publications, the L.A. Times, the San Francisco Chronicle, and the London Review of Books.

Excerpt:

THE ANTI-WAR POET and soldier Siegfried Sassoon reports that toward the end of World War I, Winston Churchill told him that war is the normal occupation of man. Challenged, Churchill amended this to “war—and gardening.” Are the two opposites? Some agriculture is a form of war, whether it’s clearcutting rainforest, stealing land from the poor, contaminating the vicinity, or exploiting farmworkers, and some of our modern pesticides are descended from chemical warfare breakthroughs for the First World War. But gardening represents a much wider spectrum of human activity than war, and if war is an act of the state, gardening is far, far more ancient than city-states (if not nearly so old as squabbling).

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July 4, 2012   Comments Off on Revolutionary Plots: Urban agriculture is producing a lot more than food