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Eat the City: A Tale of the Fishers, Foragers, Butchers, Farmers, Poultry Minders, Sugar Refiners, Cane Cutters, Beekeepers, Winemakers, and Brewers Who Built New York

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Willie Morgan has been gardening in the city since 1969 and still tends crops at age 73

By Robin Shulman
Publisher: Crown
July 10 2012
352 pages
Robin Shulman is a writer and reporter whose work has appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, Slate, the Guardian, and many other publications. She lives in New York City.

New York is not a city for growing and manufacturing food. It’s a money and real estate city, with less naked earth and industry than high-rise glass and concrete. Yet in this intimate, visceral, and beautifully written book, Robin Shulman introduces the people of New York City – both past and present – who do grow vegetables, butcher meat, fish local waters, cut and refine sugar, keep bees for honey, brew beer, and make wine. In the most heavily built urban environment in the country, she shows an organic city full of intrepid and eccentric people who want to make things grow. What’s more, Shulman artfully places today’s urban food production in the context of hundreds of years of history, and traces how we got to where we are.

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July 25, 2012   Comments Off on Eat the City: A Tale of the Fishers, Foragers, Butchers, Farmers, Poultry Minders, Sugar Refiners, Cane Cutters, Beekeepers, Winemakers, and Brewers Who Built New York

Ecopia Farms serves up microgreens

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Ko Nishimura is the founder of Ecopia, a state of the art indoor farm that uses LED lighting and organic soil for their specialty produce for chefs, in Campbell, Calif. Photo By Megan Farmer.

Ecopia grows more than 70 produce items, with microgreens making up 60 percent of the business.

By Carolyn Jung
San Francisco Chronicle
July 24, 2012

Excerpt:

Inside an old, secluded warehouse in Campbell, away from prying eyes, millions of plants flourish in soil containers under the eerie glow of LED lights.

But it’s not what you think.

No illegal substance is cultivated here. Only bronze fennel, red-veined sorrel, Russian kale, Persian cress and other gourmet edibles in miniature form, grown to exact specifications for the Bay Area’s most discriminating chefs, such as Michael Mina and Charles Phan.

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July 25, 2012   Comments Off on Ecopia Farms serves up microgreens