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Homegrown Whole Grains

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On 1000 square feet of land, backyard farmers can grow enough wheat to bake 50 loaves of fresh bread.

By Sara Pitzer
Storey Publishing, 2009
Sara Pitzer is the author of Homegrown Whole Grains and more than a dozen cookbooks and travel guides. She has studied and written about grains in Amish country in central Pennsylvania, in the southeastern United States, and in California. More recently, she has studied small-scale rice growing in Thailand and quinoa production in Peru. She lives in North Carolina.

A backyard field of grains? Yes, absolutely! Wheat and corn are rapidly replacing grass in the yards of dedicated locavores across the country. For adventurous homeowners who want to get in on the movement, Homegrown Whole Grains is the place to begin.

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April 2, 2013   2 Comments

Texas bill offers urban agriculture a boost in property tax rates

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State Rep. Eddie Rodriguez, D-Austin.

“This bill should help small businesses and make it easier for startups.”

By James Jeffrey
Austin Business Journal
Mar 25, 2013

Excerpt:

A state lawmaker hopes to ensure that the rules governing how land used for agriculture is assessed are fairly applied to vegetables farmers, small urban farmers, diversified farmers and community gardens.

House Bill 1306, filed by State Rep. Eddie Rodriguez, D-Austin, aims to clarify the existing tax code pertaining to what land can be appraised as qualified agricultural land so that property taxes are based on a lower valuation. Currently, although there is no minimum acreage requirement, many counties arbitrarily require that tracts be at least 5 acres to be considered for agricultural valuation, according to the Farm and Ranch Freedom Alliance.

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April 2, 2013   1 Comment