New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
Random header image... Refresh for more!

Home Grown: Proposal For Network Support For Household Food Production

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

Harvesting Parsnips
Harvesting Parsnips and Carrots, from ‘Tacuinum Sanitatis’.

The global Home Grown Network could be designed as a non-governmental, membership-based organization devoted to supporting household food production.

By George Kent
University of Hawai’i
kent@hawaii.edu
(Draft of October 12, 2012)
Get the complete proposal here.
George Kent is Professor Emeritus with the University of Hawai’i. He was a professor in the Department of Political Science from 1970 until his retirement at the end of 2010.

Excerpt from the proposal:

The Home Grown Network (HGN) proposed here is intended to serve as a global Internet-based service to support individuals and groups in facilitating the production of food at home, primarily for consumption rather than for sale. Information and ideas would be exchanged about how to produce food, and how to choose foods that would offer good nutritional and economic value. The network would provide access to relevant documents and videos that are now scattered throughout the world. It would also help in making connections to supportive people with similar interests. These linkages would help to build local face-to-face communities of people who would share information and ideas about household food production in ways that are appropriate in their local situation.

[Read more →]

April 13, 2013   Comments Off on Home Grown: Proposal For Network Support For Household Food Production

Luxury chicken hotel in Eugene even offers turndown service

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

hotlecluck
Bill Bezuk, owner of the Eugene Backyard Farmer in Oregon, has opened what he believes is the first chicken hotel in the country. Photo by Bill Bezuk.

When it comes to chickens the ‘cluck’ stops here

By Isolde Raftery
NBC News
April 11, 2013

Excerpt:

Chicken owners often take to urban farming blogs with this lament: Where to house the ladies when they leave town?

Bill Bezuk, owner of Eugene Backyard Farmer in Eugene, Ore., used to offer a chicken sitting service, but biking around town before and after work proved onerous, so he came up with another idea: a luxury chicken hotel.

Bezuk named it The Nest, and for now there are two suites next to Bezuk’s urban farming supply store: The Blue Andalusian and the Gold Campine. (The former is named for a rare breed with black or mottled feathers; the former is a haughty show chicken with a perky chest.)

[Read more →]

April 13, 2013   Comments Off on Luxury chicken hotel in Eugene even offers turndown service

Brooklyn Asphalt Lot is Fine Substitute for Bulldozed Garden, Education Department Says

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

dna
Residents near P.S. 133 in Brooklyn allege that the Department of Education’s School Construction Authority has failed to uphold its promise to replace the community garden it bulldozed, pictured at left — a space that is now a fenced-in asphalt lot. Photo by Leslie Albrecht.

Promised Community Garden is Field of Pavement

By Leslie Albrecht
DNAinfo New York
April 8, 2013

Excerpt:

Locals fought a passionate battle to preserve the Baltic Street community garden when it was uprooted in 2009 to make way for the new 900-seat school, which opens this fall on Fourth Avenue between Baltic and Butler streets. They won a promise from the SCA to provide a “3,000-square-foot replacement garden” next to the new school.

But when construction on the school finished recently, neighbors were outraged to find that the replacement garden was actually a swath of pavement more suitable to parking cars than planting flowers.

[Read more →]

April 13, 2013   Comments Off on Brooklyn Asphalt Lot is Fine Substitute for Bulldozed Garden, Education Department Says