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Prison Gardens Give Inmates the Opportunity to Grow Fresh Produce for Local Communities

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Prison garden designed by Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists at Sanchez Prison in El Paso, Texas. Photo by Kathleen Phillips / AgriLife Today.

A jail in Northwest Ohio reports savings of over US$25,000 as a result of prison gardens.

by Saumya Jain
Food Tank
Sept 24, 2013

Excerpt:

For prisoners, spending time in the gardens is “a whole lot better than sitting in one place and having to count the minutes go by,” according to Diana Claitor, director of the Texas Jail Project. Prison coordinators from Ohio’s Sandusky County Jail have commented that the satisfaction of gardening “gives inmates a sense of self-worth.” Moreover, prisons typically use gardening as an incentive to encourage good behavior.

But the system has its limitations. It works best in areas that have large tracts of available and fertile land. Additionally, only low and medium security prisoners, who can be allowed to leave prison grounds without safety concerns, are able to participate in these programs. The Garden Project however, has shown that prison gardening has improved the quality of rehabilitation overall.

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October 5, 2013   Comments Off on Prison Gardens Give Inmates the Opportunity to Grow Fresh Produce for Local Communities

Veggie thieves raiding community gardens in Winnipeg

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Brenda Tate’s garden in Transcona’s Paulicelli Park was teeming with vegetables — until thieves picked it bare earlier this week. Tate isn’t the only city gardener whose plentiful harvest has been pillaged this summer.

“They (the garden thieves) could get their own plots, but I guess that would be too much work,” she said.

By: Kevin Rollason
Winnipeg Free Press
09/20/2013

Excerpt:

Gardeners in community gardens and allotment gardens across the city are finding the fruits of their labours are being harvested by persons unknown.
Whether it is tomatoes, corn, cucumbers or carrots, varmints on two legs not four are making off with produce they didn’t produce.

Brenda Tate, who has rented a garden plot from the city in Paulicelli Park in Transcona for three years, said she couldn’t believe it when she and her husband went there on Tuesday to harvest their crops.

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October 5, 2013   Comments Off on Veggie thieves raiding community gardens in Winnipeg