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How Urban Agriculture Can Grow Grocers’ Revenue

grocer

Grocers who integrate and grow their own produce on rooftop farms and at local distribution centres can benefit from multiple revenue streams, reducing costs by at least 37%, according to an Oliver Wyman analysis.

By Michael Lierow
Oliver Wyman Sustainability Blog
Oct 22, 2013

Excerpt:

Commercial-scale urban agriculture presents opportunities for grocers to benefit from multiple revenue streams, while hedging against uncertain climate futures and meeting consumer demand for locally grown, organic food.

With changing global climates, securing a stable supply chain of fresh produce has become more costly: Unpredictable seasonal rains pose threats to regular crop yields; and rising fossil fuel costs threaten to increase already large transportation costs.

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October 28, 2013   Comments Off on How Urban Agriculture Can Grow Grocers’ Revenue

The Future of Urban Agriculture in Oklahoma City

pam
Chef Kamala Gamble is owner and operator of Guilford Gardens located in northwest Oklahoma City. The two-acre urban farm is dedicated to producing high-quality local food. Photo by Tricia Dameron. See ‘Guilford Gardens and Kam’s Kookery – two local urban treasures’ here.

“The ordinance surprised me in that it specifically deals with compost. I’ll be honest that I hadn’t ever thought that compost would be a legal issue, that it wasn’t already permitted.”

Author is a member of the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) and I am also an Engineer Intern (EI),
Urban Lake Effect
Oct 9, 2013

Excerpt:

When I left my job at The City of Oklahoma City, staff had made various forays into reviewing zoning regulations regarding urban agriculture. Euclidean zoning, by its nature, generally causes zoning practitioners to err on the side of caution – if something isn’t explicitly permitted, then it’s not allowed. At the very least, if something is questionable, it becomes bogged down in the red tape of government review. Therefore, when it comes to urban agriculture and its various elements, if it’s not explicitly permitted in OKC’s zoning code, it’s not allowed.

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October 28, 2013   Comments Off on The Future of Urban Agriculture in Oklahoma City