New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
Random header image... Refresh for more!

The Urban Gardens Program for HIV-Affected Women and Children: A Review and Look to the Future

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

hivethio

The Program established a total of 374 gardens — 188 school gardens, 136 community group gardens, and 50 institutional gardens — in 23 urban centres across Ethiopia.

By Peter Jensen
USAID – Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance
32 pages
April 2013

Excerpt:

Overview of the Urban Gardens Program for HIV-Affected Women and Children

The Urban Gardens Program for HIV-Affected Women and Children (UGP), funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) through the United States President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), was implemented in? six regions across Ethiopia. Phase I of UGP (2005–2008) established urban gardens in schools and on public land in many cities throughout Ethiopia. Phase II of the program (2009–2012) targeted the regions’ most vulnerable women and children, providing structured urban agricultural activities to strengthen food and livelihood insecurity and promoting linkages between HIV-affected communities and health services and facilities.

[Read more →]

November 9, 2013   Comments Off on The Urban Gardens Program for HIV-Affected Women and Children: A Review and Look to the Future

Urban Agriculture Program grows at Atlanta, Georgia school

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

schkids4

Paideia School: The 2012/2013 Crop Report shows a whopping 1,664 pounds of food grown under the auspices of the program

By Anne Dukes
Atlanta InTown
Nov 4, 2013

Excerpt:

The spirit of “Old MacDonald” is alive and well at Paideia School in Midtown as students from all grade levels participate in the Urban Agriculture Program. With a little help from their teachers, each other and the community, students grow crops, compost food scraps, raise chickens, sample home grown vegetables and share their bounty with local organizations which feed the hungry.

The 2012/2013 Crop Report shows a whopping 1,664 pounds of food grown under the auspices of the program. In all, 28 different types of food were produced, including sweet potatoes, kale, snap peas, carrots, strawberries and poultry.

[Read more →]

November 9, 2013   Comments Off on Urban Agriculture Program grows at Atlanta, Georgia school

Not Lost The Plot – The Story of Queens Road Allotments, UK

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

Not Lost The Plot – The Story of Queens Road Allotments from Bill Newsinger on Vimeo.

Beautiful 26 minute film

Film and music by Bill Newsinger
In association with The Friends of the Queens Road Allotment Society
2013
(Must see. Mike)

This is a film I have produced for the Friends of The Queens Road Allotment Society as part of their “Not Lost The Plot” heritage lottery funded project. The project has involved the production of a booklet and website as well as this film. The aim of the project has been to research and explore the history of the site as well as discovering and documenting the stories of allotment users over the years. The site is particularly unusual as the allotments are all privately owned. Allotment owners and users are not confined by regulations present on many council run sites. This film is the final edit of 4 seasonal episodes starting last winter in the thick snow. I am currently still filming an Autumn episode. The film will be screened in Leicester at the end of October 2013 at an event to celebrate the end of the project.

[Read more →]

November 9, 2013   Comments Off on Not Lost The Plot – The Story of Queens Road Allotments, UK

A look inside urban farming efforts in St. Louis and Kansas City

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

kans4
Kansas City, Kan., resident Judith Smith says Juniper Gardens, an 8-acre urban farm, has changed her perspective on food. (Elana Gordon for Harvest Public Media)

‘The more of these urban farms that we have then the greater the food security of the city and the region.’

By Brittany Ruess
Missouri Times
October 28, 2013

Excerpt:

Duschack described urban farms as “market gardens,” meaning growers are not targeting wholesalers, but local buyers like farmer’s markets or restaurants. These urban farms/market gardens grow “specialty crops,” or rather, anything that is not a commodity like soybeans or corn. Tomatoes and flowers are specialty crops, for example.

St. Louis urban farms, she said, tend to support the demographics of the community. In north St. Louis where an African American population is higher, Duschack said urban farmers grow okra, collard greens and have an interest in green tomatoes. The Burmese population living in south St. Louis grows long beans.

[Read more →]

November 9, 2013   Comments Off on A look inside urban farming efforts in St. Louis and Kansas City