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The art of the edible in Melbourne, Australia

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Grow your own: Shawn Ashkanasy (left), and Justin Hutchinson in their NGV garden. Photo by James Boddington.

Vessels concocted from former advertising banners, concrete and plastic

By Megan Backhouse
Sydney Morning Herald
November 28, 2013

Excerpt:

Composed of edible plants growing out of vessels concocted from former advertising banners, concrete and plastic, this living exhibit will be tended and harvested over the next four months as part of the wide-ranging exhibition, Melbourne Now.

Devised by the design consultancy Urban Commons, the installation is both an ephemeral art piece and a practical demonstration of the ways in which edible gardening can foster community ties.

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December 6, 2013   Comments Off on The art of the edible in Melbourne, Australia

Milwaukee turning extra land into urban agriculture

milland
Venice Williams shows some of the peppers grown at Alice’s Garden, a community garden in Milwaukee that serves as an incubator for food businesses. Williams hopes to acquire land to expand through a new program in which the city will turn over tax foreclosed properties for as little as $100 to people who want to grow gardens, create parks and establish food-related businesses. Photo by Associated Press.

Milwaukee selling tax-foreclosed properties at low cost for food promise

By M. L. Johnson
Associated Press
Nov 26, 2013

Excerpt:

But the most attention-grabbing part of Milwaukee’s plan is selling tax-foreclosed properties, perhaps for as little as $100, to people who promise to produce food. The goal is to create radical change by focusing resources — at least initially — on one neighborhood, and to have residents lead the way. In other words, they want to make it “Home GR/Own.”

The seeds have been planted in Lindsey Heights, a neighborhood just northwest of downtown. Adams’ home is less than three miles from City Hall, but economically, the areas are worlds apart. The median household income here is $22,838, half that of downtown, and the unemployment rate is six times higher at nearly 24 percent, according to the latest U.S. Census Bureau estimates.

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December 6, 2013   Comments Off on Milwaukee turning extra land into urban agriculture

The New York Times ‘Image of the Day’ November 28

indiacauli

Women working in a cauliflower field in Kolkata, West Bengal. Photo by Rupak De Chowdhuri/Reuters

Comment by Debasish Chatterjee
Calcutta, India

With vanishing greenery around the congested city of Calcutta the cultivation of Cauliflower around Eastern Bye Pass and New Town makes a wonderful difference.Amidst the concrete skyscrapers in the background the picture of the ladies working in the Cauliflower field presents a heartening picture.

December 6, 2013   Comments Off on The New York Times ‘Image of the Day’ November 28

Edible hedges: grow a vertical allotment

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Use young seedlings to start off your hedge. Photo by Jason Ingram.

Hedges can be a vertical allotment, a linear orchard of hips, herbs, nuts, edible flowers and leaves, fruit and spices

By Mark Diacono
The Telegraph
22 Nov 2013

Excerpt:

The smaller oriental quince (Chaenomeles sp) provide plenty of fruit that take to regular quince recipes perfectly. Not everyone has room for a quince tree, but a hedge that includes ‘Crimson and Gold’ or ‘Salmon Horizon’ are as flavoursome as they are fruitful. Try a few of the fruits zapped in a blender, passed through a sieve, sweetened with honey and diluted to taste.

Their smell when ripening – they’re picked when still hard in autumn and brought indoors to ripen – is even spicier than regular quince.

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December 6, 2013   Comments Off on Edible hedges: grow a vertical allotment

Chickens on Allotments – Grow Your Own Poultry Feed

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The biggest on-going cost in poultry keeping is the cost of feed, and this is also the biggest area of opportunity to save money.

The Poultry Guide
Ruleworks

Excerpt:

Fortunately at allotment gardens we can grow a diverse amount of poultry feed which means less dependence on purchasing poultry feed.

Green plants, fruit, seeds, earthworms, beetles, slugs and insects are all fresher and more nutritious for chickens than what you can buy in a bag. This will also encourage natural scratching behaviour as they search for food.

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December 6, 2013   Comments Off on Chickens on Allotments – Grow Your Own Poultry Feed