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‘Kitchen Gardens’ – Background by The Library of Congress

pucksmall‘The Quaint Old Kitchen Garden’.

Scope – General Introductions – Subject Headings – Basic Texts – Specialized Titles – Dissertations – Selected Dissertations – Abstracting and Indexing Services – Journals – Representative Journal Articles – Selected Materials – Selected Internet Resources

Science Reference Services
Science Tracer Bullets Online 07-2
The Library of Congress
September 25, 2013

Scope:

The kitchen garden, once a standard fixture of most American households, is gaining renewed attention as one component of the movement towards local, fresh and seasonal foods. Many people who take up kitchen gardening are concerned about the sustainability of a system in which most foods in a typical meal have traveled over 1,000 miles to get to their tables. Some kitchen gardeners are drawn by the variety of heirloom and hybrid plants available to growers, while others are attracted by freshness, flavor and nutritional value.

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December 25, 2013   Comments Off on ‘Kitchen Gardens’ – Background by The Library of Congress

Forget Golf Courses: Subdivisions Draw Residents With Farms

serenb
Paige Witherington is the farmer at Serenbe Farms, a 30-acre certified organic and biodynamic farm adjacent to a housing development outside Atlanta. It’s one of more than 200 or so subdivisions with an agricultural twist nationwide. Photo by Serenbe.

Development-supported agriculture, a more intimate version of community-supported agriculture

by Luke Runyon
The Salt NPR
December 17, 2013

Excerpt:

When you picture a housing development in the suburbs, you might imagine golf courses, swimming pools, rows of identical houses.

But now, there’s a new model springing up across the country that taps into the local food movement: Farms — complete with livestock, vegetables and fruit trees — are serving as the latest suburban amenity.

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December 25, 2013   Comments Off on Forget Golf Courses: Subdivisions Draw Residents With Farms