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How Two Urban Farmers Inspired a Community (and Failed as a Business)

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Two students in Harrisonburg, Virginia, turned up every last bit of its front, back and side yards into a farm.

By Andrew Jenner
Modern Farmer
January 23, 2014

Excerpt:

When they applied for a business license, however, they hit a major speedbump. City ordinances, which often aspire to an antiseptic Leave it to Beaver-ish ideal for neighborhood life, prohibited farming. Their business license was denied, and Warren and Frere were informed that Collicello Gardens was an outlaw operation. (This occurred late in the summer, and to the city’s non-draconian credit, it didn’t try to prevent them from finishing out the CSA season.)

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January 31, 2014   Comments Off on How Two Urban Farmers Inspired a Community (and Failed as a Business)

What Urban Farming Can Learn From The Developmentally Disabled

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Urban farming offers special needs people the vehicle through which they can learn a skill set in a new industry that is designed to provide a very good living if done right.

By Brian Donnelly
Powerhouse Growers
22/01/2014

Excerpt:

I remember when Kelsey first came to my greenhouse. It was all so strange for her – the system I have created is like no other – it is strange to everyone even me. There was resistance to getting in the dirt. There was nervousness about helping and doing something wrong. I stood next to her as she tried and every time her fingers touched the dirt she would wipe them on my shirt. I was very dirty after a while and she was laughing and enjoying it thoroughly.

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January 31, 2014   Comments Off on What Urban Farming Can Learn From The Developmentally Disabled

Hydroponics used to grow salad in tunnels under London

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Zero Carbon Food is growing pea shoots, rocket, red lion mustard, radish, tatsoi, pak choi and miniature broccoli in tunnels beneath London. Photograph: unknown/Zero Carbon Food

A second world war bomb shelter has been converted to grow eco-friendly salad approved by celebrity chef Michel Roux Jnr

By Tim Smedley
Guardian Professional
30 January 2014

Excerpt:

A few hundred metres from Clapham North tube station stands a padlocked gate. Behind the gate is a dark, damp entrance to a spiral staircase leading 33 metres underground. A series of tunnels built as a second world war bomb shelter large enough to fit 8,000 people have remained virtually unused. Until now. At the end of one tunnel comes a pinkish-purple glow from behind white plastic sheeting. The Breaking Bad comparison is obvious. But the produce being grown using hydroponics and LED lights isn’t illegal. It’s salad. Salad, the taste of which is liked by no less than chef Michel Roux Jnr.

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January 31, 2014   Comments Off on Hydroponics used to grow salad in tunnels under London