New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
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In Uganda, Dr. Jolly Kabirizi has converted a small piece of land into a gold mine

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Nutrition blocks help cows produce more milk. “I always make sure I offer the animals the best feeds in terms of quality and quantity,” Kabirizi says.

“Many people do not believe they can effectively rear five cows under zero grazing, feeding them on specially prepared grass.”

By Joshua Kato
New Vision
Mar 26, 2014

Excerpt:

It is difficult to believe there is a profi table agricultural enterprise inside this enclosed homestead in Seguku. The farm is located in an urban setting on less than 20 decimals of land. The same space is also occupied by nine houses, most of them for rent. Many people in urban areas have this kind of space, but regard it as useless. Not so for Dr. Jolly Kabirizi who has converted a small piece of land into a gold mine.

There are currently five cows at the backyard farm, all Friesians for milk production. Initially, Kabirizi was rearing over 20 goats. “I would have taken my cows to the village where I have bigger land. However, I wanted to live with and monitor their development,” she says.

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April 2, 2014   Comments Off on In Uganda, Dr. Jolly Kabirizi has converted a small piece of land into a gold mine

In 1969 Joe Pignatano Grew a Vegetable Garden in Shea Stadium

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Joey Pignatano tending to his tomatoes using bats to prop them up in mets bullpen. Pitcher Jack Dilauro over his shoulder. 1969.

“In 1969 I discovered a wild tomato plant in the bullpen and nurtured it the rest of the season,” he remembered. “We got some tomatoes off it, but most important we won the whole thing. After that, I kept up the garden as long as I was with the Mets as a good luck charm.”

By Albin Krebs and Robert McG. Thomas
New York Times
October 8, 1981

It was back in 1969, Joe Pignatano recalled yesterday, that a stray tomato plant pushed its way up through the dirt beyond the right field fence in Shea Stadium. That was also the year the Mets won the World Series, and to Mr. Pignatano, a Mets pitching coach and amateur gardener, the plant was a good omen.

So the next year he planted a few omens of his own. The Mets never did win another World Series, but Mr. Pignatano never gave up on his bullpen garden: by this year, the 30-foot-long plot held not only tomatoes, but also vegetables such as pumpkins, eggplants, squash, zucchini, radishes and lettuce.

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April 2, 2014   Comments Off on In 1969 Joe Pignatano Grew a Vegetable Garden in Shea Stadium

Austin-based urban farm aims to revolutionize the food supply chain

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Green in the city: Participants of the tour were treated to gourmet delicacies and high-end cocktails. Urban Till produces dozens of varieties of herbs at its facility in Austin. Photo by Timothy Inklebarger.

The business started with four herbs — cilantro, dill, arugula and basil — in 2012 and has since grown to more than 50 varieties of herbs and lettuces.

By Timothy Inklebarger
Oak Park
March 25th, 2014

Excerpt:

But within the nondescript walls of the multistory facility an urban farm has taken root. Its owners are fine-tuning a proprietary hydroponic method to grow thousands of high-end micro greens and other vegetables to be sold at some of the top restaurants in the Chicago area, including Marion Street Cheese Market in Oak Park and Autre Monde Café & Spirits in Berwyn.

The owners of Urban Till, which operates the 30,000-square-foot urban farm, opened their doors to a select group of about 100 restaurateurs, chefs, sustainable food advocates and industry insiders for the first time on March 21.

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April 2, 2014   Comments Off on Austin-based urban farm aims to revolutionize the food supply chain