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Posts from — May 2014

The Indian Kitchen Gardener: It’s always Eden on Lavannya Goradia’s Bangalore terrace

bangal

I grow about 35 different vegetables, a few fruits, plants solely for my butterfly friends and lots of herbs.

By Kavya Chandra
The Alternative
May 21, 2014

Excerpts:

I was born and brought up in Baroda and came to Bangalore to practice architecture and design. Currently I run a small studio that specialises in contemporary and environmentally friendly architecture in the city.

Gardening came from my love for cooking that draws inspiration from Jamie Oliver, especially the series of Jamie At Home! After shifting into a bigger space I had the freedom of growing many kinds of vegetables and greens and taken full advantage of my terrace. I now look forward everyday now to home-grown, clean organic produce.

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May 24, 2014   Comments Off on The Indian Kitchen Gardener: It’s always Eden on Lavannya Goradia’s Bangalore terrace

Craigslist – Story of the loss of a rooftop garden

craigroof

Emergency garden eviction sale! – $5 – Vancouver BC

Posting:

Tragedy, in the form of the management company for the apartment that I live in, has struck my rooftop garden. Here is the story:

Last summer I started to build a garden on the roof of my apartment building. I had permission to do this. Since I started so late in the season it was all I could do to just get some containers of potting soil up there. Not much grew, but it was this season that was going to be the real deal for me.

Over the course of the autumn and winter I managed to collect some more 5 gallon containers. There is now about 100 containers and planters up there. The management asked me to remove some things, which I did. I was warned that they could at any time ask me to remove more. Well, yesterday I got a letter saying that they wanted me to remove some more. 90 percent more!

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May 24, 2014   Comments Off on Craigslist – Story of the loss of a rooftop garden

Urban farm blooms in Raleigh, North Carolina

“Right now … farmers aren’t really recognized as entrepreneurs in the urban environment.”

By Justin Quesinberry
WNCN News
May 12, 2014

Excerpt:

Spitzer said one of the benefits of urban farming is the visibility that comes with being downtown. Adjacent the Raleigh City Farm is the newly revitalized Person Street Market, which is part of the North Person Street Business District that USA Today named one of the top up-and-coming neighborhoods in the United States.

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May 24, 2014   Comments Off on Urban farm blooms in Raleigh, North Carolina

Egyptian Model of a Garden from Middle Kingdom ca. 1981-1975 B.C.

egyptancient
See larger image here.

Pond surrounded by sycamore fig trees with red fruit growing from the trunks and branches

From the Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art
Period: Middle Kingdom
Dynasty: Dynasty 12
Reign: reign of Amenemhat I, early
Date: ca. 1981–1975 B.C.
Geography: From Egypt, Upper Egypt; Thebes, Southern Asasif, Tomb of
Medium: Wood, paint Copper

Excerpt from the Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art:

This model of a garden and portico was discovered in a hidden chamber at the side of the passage leading into the rock cut tomb of the royal chief steward Meketre, who began his career under King Nebhepetre Mentuhotep II of Dynasty 11 and continued to serve successive kings into the early years of Dynasty 12.

In the center of the garden is a pond surrounded by sycamore fig trees with red fruit growing from the trunks and branches. The pond is lined with copper and could have been filled with water. Facing the garden is the porch of a house. Two rows of columns support the roof made of palm trunks split into halves. The rear columns have capitals in the form of papyrus stalks bound together, the capitals of the front columns imitate bundles of lotus. Rainfall is rare in Upper Egypt, but such an eventuality is provided for in three projecting spouts.

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May 24, 2014   Comments Off on Egyptian Model of a Garden from Middle Kingdom ca. 1981-1975 B.C.

Tucson City considering revisions to urban agriculture regulations

tuscon
Chickens and compost may be OK at Manzo Elementary, but some folks object to these activities in neighborhoods.

“Let’s legalize it and bring people out of the shadows,” she says. “The code has to catch up with our practice.”

By Elena Acoba
May 11, 2014
Arizona Daily Star

Excerpt:

The proposed changes that address urban agriculture deal with:

Gardens at several levels — home gardens, community gardens and urban farms.
Small farm animals raised at residential and community gardens.
The sale of produce from homes, community sites and farmers markets.
Greenhouses ranging from plant shelters to structures that are mechanically temperature-controlled.
Composting.

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May 23, 2014   Comments Off on Tucson City considering revisions to urban agriculture regulations

Food Safety News – Safely integrating urban agriculture

Frequent Watering of the Victory Garden Is Necessary During the Early Stages of Growth. ca. 02:1943
Watering the Victory Garden. 1943.

While growing food within city limits is exciting for urban dwellers, it also raises some unique food safety issues.

By Kelly Damewood
Food Safety News
May 2, 2014

Excerpt:

To be clear, my opinion is that urban farmers and gardeners can absolutely keep livestock safely within the city limits. However, my experience has been that urban livestock keepers are also more likely to be novices. As a result, I have seen some unfortunate situations where people underestimate the amount of attention baby goats need or the dedication it takes to milk a goat every day.

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May 23, 2014   Comments Off on Food Safety News – Safely integrating urban agriculture

The New Yorker Magazine: Gentrification And The Urban Garden

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A rendering of City Slicker Farms’ plans for a farm and park in West Oakland. Image courtesy City Slicker Farms.

If young home buyers like chickens and goats and kale, real-estate agents like them even more.

By Lauren Markham
The New Yorker
May 21, 2014
(Must read. Mike)

Excerpt:

The “blighted” lots suitable for urban agriculture are often found in lower-income neighborhoods like NOBE, as well as in post-industrial neighborhoods like West Oakland and West Berkeley. These also happen to be neighborhoods that developers see as ripe for construction. For decades, the overgrown grass across the street from Jeff DeMartini’s commercial property in West Berkeley (formerly his grandfather’s cabinet factory) had been giving him trouble: weeds encroaching on the sidewalk, phallic graffiti, dead trees that occasionally came crashing down. Last year, a community-agriculture organization called Urban Adamah acquired the space, and announced plans to install a small farm—chickens, goats, and all. At first, DeMartini worried that the animals might degrade the site even further. “I thought, Will it smell?” But, within a matter of weeks, interest in his property spiked, and prospective renters came calling.

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May 22, 2014   Comments Off on The New Yorker Magazine: Gentrification And The Urban Garden

Vancouver’s urban homesteaders go back to the land

duncchick
East Vancouver’s Duncan Martin, of DailyEggs, has been installing two or three bylaw-compliant “Vancooper” chicken coops per month in city dwellers’ back yards. Phot by Trevor Brady.

“And when you make your own stuff, you’re in control of your own stuff.”

By Jessica Werb
Georgia Straight
May 14, 2014

Excerpt:

When it comes to keeping chickens, the first name on Havlak’s list is Duncan Martin, designer and builder of the Vancooper chicken coop. Martin, an East Vancouver transplant from Vermont, builds the coops out of repurposed local cedar and sells them for $700. Since starting the business in 2010, Daily Eggs, Martin says, he’s been installing about two to three of them a month.

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May 22, 2014   Comments Off on Vancouver’s urban homesteaders go back to the land

Urban Agriculture: Food Equity and Food Ecology

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Bradner Gardens Park and Community Garden. Photo by Ken Kailing. Click on image for larger file.

“I don’t think there is anything easy about finding the right urban agro-ecology, but I do know it needs to happen.”

Ken Kailing,
Good Food World
May 2nd, 2014

Excerpt:

Urban agriculture, whether grown in community gardens or in large commercial warehouses, is here to stay – and increasing. And along with it, new accommodations need to take place between neighbours.

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May 22, 2014   Comments Off on Urban Agriculture: Food Equity and Food Ecology

This Decrepit Lot in Washington D.C. is the Future Site of the World’s Largest Urban Greenhouse

lot

The 100,000-square-foot greenhouse (close to 2.3 acres) will produce 1 million pounds of produce—including tomatoes on the vine, leafy-green mixes

Matt Vasilogambros
The Atlantic Cities
MAY 05, 2014

Excerpt:

Two 20-foot-tall piles of razed rubble, twisted metal, and warped wood are the backdrops. A gnarled bicycle and dozens of unmatched shoes nearly hidden by overgrown prairie grass and weeds litter the ground between three large, white shipping containers that belong more on a freighter than in a city lot on the edge of Washington’s southeastern border.

But in a few months, this abandoned lot in the Anacostia neighborhood of the capital city will become home to the world’s largest urban greenhouse, eventually producing tons of produce, creating dozens of new jobs, and providing fresh food to areas in need.

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May 21, 2014   Comments Off on This Decrepit Lot in Washington D.C. is the Future Site of the World’s Largest Urban Greenhouse

Malaysian Ministry expects 20 percent of city folk to take up urban agriculture

datuk
The Agriculture and Agro-based Industry Minister Datuk Seri Ismail Sabri Yaakob.

He said RM1 million had been allocated for the campaign, which included the distribution of seedlings and fertiliser and providing training, briefing and guidance

New Straits Times
May 8, 2014

PUTRAJAYA: The Agriculture and Agro-based Industry Ministry anticipates that about 20 per cent of people in cities nationwide will participate in urban agriculture.

Minister Datuk Seri Ismail Sabri Yaakob said it would enable them to reduce their daily expenditure and increase their income should they be able harvest additional produce for sale.

“Land may be scarce in the cities but with the aid of modern technology, this can be achieved,” he told reporters after launching an urban agriculture campaign for the Federal Territory of Putrajaya here today.

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May 21, 2014   Comments Off on Malaysian Ministry expects 20 percent of city folk to take up urban agriculture

Urban Agriculture as a Strategy for Animal Welfare

animcare
Around seven-tenths (69%) of EU citizens claim to have some knowledge of the conditions under which animals are farmed in their country. However, few are fully confident in the extent of this knowledge with only 12% saying they know ‘a lot’ on this matter. Rather, the majority (57%) say that they possess ‘a little’ knowledge with 28% claiming to know ‘nothing at all’.

Urban farms connect citizens to agriculture on a personal level, which may be a more effective means of generating interest in farm animal welfare.

By Lindsay Nakonechny
ClassyAwards
January 2014
Fellow, Animal & Wildlife Welfare

Excerpt:

Now why is animal welfare important? Besides many ethical concerns, animal welfare confers many benefits including animal health, food safety and quality, reduced profit loss, and sustainable farming. Despite this significance, many consumers cannot afford time to research animal welfare standards, nor have access to farms where they can witness livestock care firsthand.

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May 21, 2014   Comments Off on Urban Agriculture as a Strategy for Animal Welfare

Field-To-Plate at Nobu at Four Seasons Resort Lanai at Manele Bay, Hawaii

lanai
Executive Chef Sean Mell in the garden.

More than 65 percent of what is used on the menu is from the garden.

By Lori Holland
Director of Public Relations
Four Seasons
Feb. 26, 2014

Nobu Lanai, located at Four Seasons Resort Lanai at Manele Bay, offers fresh flavours on its unique and innovative menu – fresh from the farm that is.

The half-acre Nobu Garden is home to a wide variety of herbs and vegetables, including baby lettuce, tomatoes, squash, scallions, watermelon radish, red beets, carrots, green beans, asparagus and cilantro. Ingredients particularly relevant to the menu at Nobu include daikon, Japanese eggplant, edamame, shishito peppers, cucumber flowers, and even sesame. Produce is harvested daily to ensure freshness.

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May 20, 2014   Comments Off on Field-To-Plate at Nobu at Four Seasons Resort Lanai at Manele Bay, Hawaii

Grasscutter rearing in Accra, Ghana: a novel way to ensure food security in the inner city

grasscut
A Grasscutter.

Grasscutter farming has become a thriving business from merely a hobby for many in Accra, capital city of Ghana

By Dr.Mohemmed Habibur Rahman, Professor of Pathology, Department of Pathology, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, Bangladesh
At present: School of Veterinary Medicine, College of Agriculture and Consumer Science, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra, Ghana. P.O.Box: LG 586, Legon

Excerpt:

The grasscutter (Thryonomys swinderianus) is one of the very few wild animal species who has not only been domesticated but used for the benefit of the mankind. West Africa is regarded as the home of Grasscutter and for the last couple of decades has been the source of employment, income and bush meat in Ghana. Grasscutter is variously known as the marsh cane-rat , ground hog and in francophone West Africa, the aulacode or incorrectly, the agouti is a rodent but not a rat proper, since it belongs to the Hystricomorpha (porcupine family). In “Ga” language they are called Kpin (pin) and also locally known as Akrante.

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May 20, 2014   Comments Off on Grasscutter rearing in Accra, Ghana: a novel way to ensure food security in the inner city

A Green and Pleasant Land: How England’s Gardeners Fought the Second World War

greenand

‘War is the normal occupation of man – war and gardening’ Winston Churchill

By Ursula Buchan
Windmill Books, part of Cornerstone Publishing
2013

The wonderfully evocative story of how Britain’s World War Two gardeners – with great ingenuity, invincible good humour and extraordinary fortitude – dug for victory on home turf.

A Green and Pleasant Land tells the intriguing and inspiring story of how Britain’s wartime government encouraged and cajoled its citizens to grow their own fruit and vegetables. As the Second World War began in earnest and a whole nation listened to wireless broadcasts, dug holes for Anderson shelters, counted their coupons and made do and mended, so too were they instructed to ‘Dig for Victory’.

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May 19, 2014   Comments Off on A Green and Pleasant Land: How England’s Gardeners Fought the Second World War