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Documentary: “Food Cartographers” track food growing in the wild in cities

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The conclusion of Welty’s Boulder study is that residents could get their produce from urban agriculture five to six months a year.

By Anna Maria Barry-Jester
FiveThirtyEight
Dec 16, 2014

Excerpt:

Last week, FiveThirtyEight and ESPN Films published the first in a series of short documentaries called The Collectors, profiles of people who use data in innovative ways. “Cartographers of the Edible World” introduced Evan Welty and Caleb Phillips, who built an open-source, user-generated website that catalogs the location of edible plants all over the world. When the two men met, Phillips was interested in technology for social organizing. Welty was using publicly available data to map arable land. They both had maps for personal use that helped them forage food from city parks and public spaces in Boulder, Colorado, where they live.

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December 17, 2014   Comments Off on Documentary: “Food Cartographers” track food growing in the wild in cities

In 19th-century New York, urban livestock were perceived as a threat

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taming
“Today, proponents argue that urban agriculture and local food sources promote ‘sustainable cities,’” writes historian Catherine McNeur in her new book, Taming Manhattan: Environmental Battles in the Antebellum City. “In the nineteenth century, many Americans would have believed the opposite.”

When Gentrification Meant Driving the Hogs Out of Manhattan

By Sarah Goodyear
citylab
Dec 16, 2014

Excerpt:

In order for Manhattan to become the center of a nation’s wealth and high culture, as McNeur illustrates, the dirty work of agriculture and food production had to be pushed out and made invisible—along with the lower-class people who made their living from animals and their by-products. The result, she writes, was a volatile and unsettled period in which rancor and division among citizens was heightened by the question over who had the right to use the city’s rapidly vanishing common spaces.

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December 17, 2014   Comments Off on In 19th-century New York, urban livestock were perceived as a threat