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Singapore Management University plants seeds for new urban farming movement

smu
(From left) Imran Aljunied, 28, SMU President Professor Arnoud De Meyer, Mayor for Central Singapore District Denise Phua and urban farmer Donald Tan, 48, plant a nutmeg sapling at the Grow initiative at the Singapore Management University campus on Jan 6, 2015. Photo By Alphonsus Chern.

Under the project, 30 planter boxes containing plants such as herbs, will also be put up for adoption at $80 a box.

By Olivia Ho
The Straits Times
Jan 7, 2015

Excerpt:

SINGAPORE – A new urban farming movement is taking root in the heart of the city at Singapore Management University (SMU).

The university launched its new Grow initiative to encourage gardening and sustainable living on Tuesday morning, when it started a new garden plot outside the School of Accountancy and Law building along Queen Street.

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January 16, 2015   Comments Off on Singapore Management University plants seeds for new urban farming movement

Campaigning for Urban Agriculture in Sacramento, the Farm to Fork Capital


Paul Trudeau with Southside Aquaponics inside his backyard greenhouse.

A state law enacted in 2013 allows cities to create urban agriculture incentive zones, which would reduce property taxes if landowners allow small scale farming.

By Amy Quinton
Capital Public Radio
January 05, 2015

Excerpt:

Trudeau had a business license to sell the food to restaurants, but he wanted to expand. He found an oddly-shaped commercial lot in a blighted area and found an owner willing to let him put a greenhouse on it. But then he ran into trouble.

“I went to the city though to check it out, like ‘what would I have to do’ and they were like, ‘Well raising food, that’s not a permitted use in the commercial zone or residential zone,'” says Trudeau. “So I kind of got stopped in my tracks there.”

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January 16, 2015   Comments Off on Campaigning for Urban Agriculture in Sacramento, the Farm to Fork Capital

Is solar the solution for millions of people without access to electric light?


Video via The Verge.
(Must see. Mike)

MPOWERD has developed “Luci” a low-cost, waterproof, solar-powered lantern that could replace kerosene lamps in the developing world

About Luci

How does Luci work?

Luci has three main components that make her work: (1) a solar panel that captures photons from sunlight or incandescent light; (2) a rechargeable internal battery that stores her power; and (3) 10 LED bulbs that produce her light.

Does Luci need any additional parts, such as batteries or a charger?

No – unlike some other solar lights, Luci does not require any additional parts, since her unit contains solar PV cells, a battery, and LED lights all in one.

How does Luci charge?

Luci’s solar panels charge when facing sunlight or incandescent light. In direct sunlight, Luci will fully charge in 8 hours. She will charge even when it’s cloudy outside, but it will take longer. To charge Luci in incandescent light, place the solar panel close to the light bulb – but not so close that it becomes hot. It will take longer than 8 hours to charge under incandescent light.

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January 16, 2015   Comments Off on Is solar the solution for millions of people without access to electric light?