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Farming for fun could revive Hong Kong’s country park enclaves

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Farmer James Lam Chi-lap (left) teaches Javas Lo Ho-yin how to do some gardening at the farming collective Sangwoodgoon, Tse Uk Tsuen, Kam Sheung Road, Yuen Long. Photo: Dickson Lee

Farming for fun and new guest houses could offer a green solution for controversial sites that lie within country parks but are not part of them

By Olga Wong and Ernest Kao
South China Morning Post
21 January, 2015

Country park enclaves could become home to leisure farming and guest-house developments, with pilot schemes to be carried out in two areas soon, the head of the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department said.

The idea emerged after talks between department director Alan Wong Chi-kong and rural representative body the Heung Yee Kuk on the city’s new agricultural policy yesterday. The policy includes promoting leisure farming – which typically involves small-scale farms that produce little but give people a chance to experience farming life.

The idea could help solve the dilemma of the enclaves – scores of village sites within park boundaries that are not part of the parks. Development has been frozen while the government considers zoning plans for the enclaves. The matter sparked conflict between conservationists, who want the areas protected, and landowners, who fear losing development rights.

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January 30, 2015   Comments Off on Farming for fun could revive Hong Kong’s country park enclaves

Urban farming could improve food security but also increases the competition between urban and rural water needs.

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Feeding the cities with food and water is changing the Indian agricultural landscape.

By Dilrukshi Handunnetti
AsianScientist
January 20, 2015

Excerpt:

South and East Asia comprise 49 percent of urban irrigated croplands and 56 percent of the non-urban irrigated areas globally. These two regions account for 26 percent of urban rain-fed croplands and 22 percent of non-urban rain-fed croplands.

Drechsel says, “The study documents that 70 percent of households in developing countries are engaged in some kind of farming and food production and challenges the notion that food production, far from being a rural phenomenon, is commonly occurring within cities.”

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January 30, 2015   Comments Off on Urban farming could improve food security but also increases the competition between urban and rural water needs.

Food Tank Summit: “Cultivating Better Urban Food Systems”

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Features a group of advocates for changing where we grow our foods and how we think about the origin of our food.

Written by Maggie Roth, GWU Student
2015 Food Tank Summit
Jan 28, 2015

Excerpts:

The panel’s last speaker was instantly recognizable to most in the audience: winner of the James Beard Foundation Medal, restauranteur, head judge on television’s Top Chef, and passionate food activist, Chef Tom Colicchio. As a special guest at the Food Tank Summit, Colicchio recalled his own experiences with urban farming in Elizabeth N.J., watching his grandfather grow vegetables in five-gallon containers.

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January 30, 2015   Comments Off on Food Tank Summit: “Cultivating Better Urban Food Systems”