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Wyoming Vertical Farm will produce 37,000 pounds of greens, 4,400 pounds of herbs, and 44,000 pounds of tomatoes

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Under construction and design of the finished vertical farm.

Vertical Harvest broke ground in December and expects to be up and running by early 2016.

By Garnet Henderson
City Lab
Feb 17, 2015

Excerpts:

Vertical Harvest of Jackson Hole will be a three-story, 13,500-square-foot hydroponic greenhouse. It is situated on a skinny, leftover parcel of public land, 150 feet long by just 30 feet wide, next to a parking garage. The greenhouse will operate year-round and grow as much produce annually as would come from five acres of traditional agriculture. Ninety-five percent of Vertical Harvest’s eventual production is already under pre-purchase agreements with local restaurants and grocery stores.

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February 28, 2015   Comments Off on Wyoming Vertical Farm will produce 37,000 pounds of greens, 4,400 pounds of herbs, and 44,000 pounds of tomatoes

Infographic: How many ways can a building grow food?

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Above are five innovative indoor farms across the world along with their AVF typologies. Click here for full image.

The data was commissioned by the U.S.-based Indoor Agriculture Conference

The Association for Vertical Farming (AVF) aims to educate industry leaders and the public on the possibilities of integrating food production into cities. It believes it is essential that professionals and the public alike understand that there is a multitude of ways to integrate food production. In response to this challenge, the AVF has developed a 7 factor typology for integration, based upon existing urban agriculture case studies.

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February 28, 2015   Comments Off on Infographic: How many ways can a building grow food?