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The end of the Los Angeles lawn

lawngo
A worker installs an artificial lawn in front of an apartment building in San Jose, California.

Next, the state should direct its focus to farms, which consume 80% of all human-used water in California and generate only 2% of the state’s gross domestic product.

By John D. Sutter
CNN
April 2, 2015

Excerpt:

“We’re so used to Southern California having these beautiful, lush lawns and palm trees and seasonal flowers,” she told me by phone from Culver City, a suburb of Los Angeles, where she is general manager at a landscaping business called A Greener Tomorrow. But now, because of the drought and new water regulations, “I’m telling you, all I see is Arizona and Las Vegas.”

“Who’s going to be willing to pay?” she said. “You can’t maintain a lawn!”

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April 2, 2015   Comments Off on The end of the Los Angeles lawn

Malaysia’s Damansara Jaya residents’ venture into vertical farming drums

barel
Rolling up their sleeves: (From left) National Unity Department director Ho Khek Hua, DJROA deputy president Ronald Ng Chee Kong, Department of Agriculture, urban agriculture division director Yunus Ismail and Yew examining the vertical farming barrel.

Yew said the overall cost for the DJROA setup was about RM2,000 for six vertical farming drums and the soil while Mardi provided the seedlings.

By Hannah Jonas
The Star
Mar 24, 2015

Excerpt:

“As it uses hydroponic or fertigation technology, there is no need for tilling the ground or watering the vegetables.

“Thus, it eliminates the tedious work required in traditional farming,” said Soong.

“This technology only uses a 1hp water pump to recirculate the water coming out of the hydroponic or fertigation process.

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Backyard plastic bubble in Greater Vancouver is Canada’s first biodome

ecodom
Tom Colclough is growing about 6,000 strawberry plants hydroponically on his Surrey farm in an agricultural biodome. Photograph by: Ric Ernst.

Climate-controlled domes touted as a local food solution for remote communities

By Randy Shore
Vancouver Sun
April 1, 2015

Excerpt:

The 3,000-square-foot plastic bubble in Tom Colclough’s Surrey yard is packed with 6,000 strawberry plants that require no soil and use one-tenth the water of conventional farming.

Canada’s first agricultural “biodome” is made from air-tight layers of ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), a plastic film that weighs 99-per-cent less than glass and naturally disperses light within the dome, creating an ideal environment for vertical hydroponic growing systems, said designer Colclough.

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April 2, 2015   Comments Off on Backyard plastic bubble in Greater Vancouver is Canada’s first biodome