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The buzz around indoor farms and artificial lighting makes no sense

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Growing food using indoor lighting can have significantly higher environmental costs Photograph: Credit Punk Toad

Feeding cities more sustainably will be key to food security but time, resources and capital might be better invested away from indoor farming

By Michael Hamm
Guardian
Apr 10, 2015

Excerpt:

New York City residents each consumed about 24kg of bread per year. It would take about 8.6m square metres of floor space stacked three high per floor, to grow New York City’s wheat. That’s equal to nearly three Empire State Buildings. It might seem very efficient to produce all the bread in three large buildings, but constructing and running them will have their own environmental footprint.

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April 22, 2015   Comments Off on The buzz around indoor farms and artificial lighting makes no sense

India: Mumbaikars Learn Growing Organic Vegetables at Home from Recyclable Materials

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People learned how a crushed plastic bottle, those soiled pair of boots could be used for planting the organic vegetables

By Priyanka Das
Carmine Communications
Mumbai, 22nd April, 2015

Excerpt:

On the eve of World Earth Day, Growel’s 101 Mall in association with Earthoholics conducted a 2 hour workshop to provide hands on experience on optimum utilization of natural resources and urban farming to the participants. A live display of the innovative recycling process which turns scrap to useful objects was also being shown to encourage people to conserve environment.

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April 22, 2015   Comments Off on India: Mumbaikars Learn Growing Organic Vegetables at Home from Recyclable Materials

How One Visionary Changed School Food in Detroit

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Betti Wiggins, courtesy of Excellent Schools Detroit and Detroit Metro Parent.

She started a farm-to-school program that now includes 76 school gardens.

By Chris Hardman
Civil Eats
April 6, 2015

Excerpt:

The companion program to the meal service is the Detroit School Garden Collaborative. Wiggins comes from a farming background and has maintained strong ties to the agricultural community. With the help of a school board member, she started a farm-to-school program that now includes 76 school gardens. To make sure gardens thrive, each participating school has to sign a contract committing staff time to maintain its garden. DPS employs a garden director, a farmer, and a horticulturist to run the program.

The largest DPS farm is located at the Drew Transition Center, a school for young adults with special needs. There, a 2-1/4-acre farm and 96-square-foot hoop house produce corn, greens, and root vegetables. More than 7,000 ears of corn from the Drew farm ended up on the plates of schoolchildren throughout Detroit last year.

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April 22, 2015   Comments Off on How One Visionary Changed School Food in Detroit