New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
Random header image... Refresh for more!

Kim Wilde: ‘Horticulture gave me back my life.

kimw
Gardens are always the first place I go to regenerate’.

The singer is leading an appeal for the charity Thrive, which uses the therapy of horticulture

By Jane Merrick
The Independent
19 April 2015

Excerpt:

The Eighties pop star Kim Wilde has revealed how gardening helped her through bouts of anxiety and to restore “balance” after a turbulent time in the music business.

In a BBC appeal for the charity Thrive, which helps people with physical disabilities and mental health issues through gardening therapy, Wilde says: “Horticulture really brought me back to life. Gardens are always the first place I go to regenerate … they are a complete sensory experience.”

[Read more →]

April 28, 2015   Comments Off on Kim Wilde: ‘Horticulture gave me back my life.

Baltimore Council grants preliminary OK to tax breaks for urban farms

balt
Denzel Mitchell, of Baltimore owns operates “Five Seeds Farm” and provides its vegetables to local Baltimore restaurants. (Rachel Woolf / Baltimore Sun)

“There is lots of underutilized land in Baltimore City. I strongly believe producing food on the land is a viable use for the city and for young entrepreneurs.”

By Luke Broadwater
The Baltimore Sun
Apr 27, 2015

Excerpt:

The City Council gave preliminary approval Monday to a bill that would grant a large tax break for urban farmers in Baltimore.

The bill, sponsored by City Councilman William “Pete” Welch, would provide a 90 percent property tax break for urban farmers who grow and sell at least $5,000 of fruit and vegetables a year. The credits, which must be approved by the city’s Office of Sustainability, are good for five years, but can be renewed for a total of 10 years, according to the bill.

[Read more →]

April 28, 2015   Comments Off on Baltimore Council grants preliminary OK to tax breaks for urban farms

This Hollywood Restaurant Grows Your Food Next To Your Table

roofair
When the founders began researching vertical gardens, they learned about aeroponic towers made by a company called Green City Farms—basically, plant-filled poles. Photos: via Tender Greens.

The chain, Tender Greens, is adopting a drought-friendly kind of farming.

By Adele Peters
Co Exist
Apr 16, 2015

Excerpt:

Once a week, the restaurant harvests produce from the towers and uses it in a daily special. “It’s fun for chefs,” he says. “They’re absolutely connected to the plants, because they’ve been watching them grow all week.”

With the restaurant’s high volumes, the towers can only provide a tiny fraction of the food served (and, sadly, diners can’t harvest their own greens to put directly in a salad). But the towers serve as a visible sign of the company’s bigger shift to ultra-efficient farming as California’s drought worsens. Hydroponic farming can save as much as 90% of the water that would be used to grow food in the field.

[Read more →]

April 28, 2015   Comments Off on This Hollywood Restaurant Grows Your Food Next To Your Table