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Why Joining the Urban Agriculture Movement Will Make You Healthier

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washgarCommon Good City Farm produces food for low-income neighborhoods in the District of Columbia.

In 2014, the USDA reported a total of 8,268 farmers markets nationwide, an increase of 76 percent since 2008. That increase was partly due to demand for more local food.

By Corinne Ruff
US News and World Report
June 23, 2015

Excerpt:

As a gardener and researcher of human rights for adequate food and nutrition, Anne Bellows, professor of food studies at Syracuse University, says these urban farms play an important role in retaining public health.

“It’s important to understand and be aware of what the huge multitude of benefits are,” she says. “The food and the nutrition are important, but also very critical are benefits like access to green, quiet, safe space where other people are meeting and working – some place that is a refuge.”

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July 3, 2015   Comments Off on Why Joining the Urban Agriculture Movement Will Make You Healthier

What Kale and Arugula Have to Do with Reducing Recidivism in Miami, Florida

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nationsUrban Greenworks executive-cirector James Jiler and Roger Horne, director of community health relations, share some freshly picked fruit from Cerasee Farm. See more photos of inner city gardens in Miami here. Photos by Ryan Stone.

This group is soothing inner-city tensions, spade in hand.

By Chris Peak
Nation Swell
June 18, 2015

Excerpt:

It’s mango season in Miami, and James Jiler’s kitchen counter keeps filling with bags and bags of the tropical fruit. The towering mound accumulates nearly faster than he can slice the mangos apart or blend them together in a summer daiquiri.

Tasty as the fresh fruit is already, it’s even sweeter to Jiler because of where it comes from: many of the mangoes were nurtured and picked by at-risk youth, halfway house residents and the formerly incarcerated. As the executive director of Urban Greenworks, Jiler provides green jobs and environmental programs like planting in urban spaces or science education in schools to troubled residents of Miami. Since the organization’s start in 2010, roughly 55 people have been employed by the nonprofit, plus hundreds more have served as volunteers.

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July 3, 2015   Comments Off on What Kale and Arugula Have to Do with Reducing Recidivism in Miami, Florida