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From family’s farm land, Jim Embry brought knowledge, passion to Lexington’s community gardens in Kentucky

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“Our garden literally began as a parking lot space for semi trucks in an industrial setting in downtown Lexington as a very simple hoop house garden,” Kelley said. “Today, it is the largest community garden I know of in downtown Lexington.”

By Beverly Fortune
Kentucky.com
August 7, 2015

Excerpt:

Embry helped organized the first Food Summit in Lexington in 2007, met with then-Fayette County Schools superintendent Stu Silberman to share his Detroit experience and encourage school gardens, and approached the city about community gardens in city parks.

“Jim was at the forefront of the community gardening movement in Lexington. We lagged behind other cities, like Chicago and New York, with long traditions of community gardens. He was important in getting community gardens started here,” said Dehlia Scott, horticulture agent with the Fayette County Cooperative Extension Service.

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August 25, 2015   Comments Off on From family’s farm land, Jim Embry brought knowledge, passion to Lexington’s community gardens in Kentucky

Urban farms need financially sound business models to be truly sustainable

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Before launching an urban farm, the producer should consider the effect of scale along with substantial production risks. Expect small, single digit returns on their investment with the need for development of an appropriate business strategy.

By Frank Gublo,
Michigan State University Extension
Posted on August 17, 2015

Excerpt:

Every week Michigan State University Extension educators and MSU Product Center counselors receive inquiries about the feasibility of starting a farm. In recent years, the interest in sustainable urban agriculture as a tool for repurposing cities such as Detroit has grown but has produced few ventures at a commercial scale. Financial sustainability urban farm operations we see in southeast Michigan however is still questionable. This is due to the smaller scale, lower prices of fruit and vegetable crops, and the production management skills of the farmer-producer. The dream of becoming a full time urban farmer is a lofty goal that few will achieve. Strategy, realistic planning, and beautiful execution of the farm plans are critical in achieving a successful outcome.

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August 25, 2015   Comments Off on Urban farms need financially sound business models to be truly sustainable