New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
Random header image... Refresh for more!

Homeless Plant a Massive Organic Rooftop Garden in Atlanta, GA, Then Use it to Feed an Entire Shelter

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

hoeayl

Residents of the shelter are responsible for 80 separate garden beds

By Jay Syrmopoulos
Free Thought
August 30, 2015

Excerpt:

“It is important to share and train residents in green technology that we are involved in because poor and homeless people are being left out of the green development that we see burgeoning in our community,” Anita Beaty, executive director of Metro Atlanta Task Force, told Atlanta Progressive News.

The gardening program, managed by the Metro Atlanta Task Force for the Homeless, works to allow homeless people access to food previously considered out-of-reach.

[Read more →]

September 5, 2015   Comments Off on Homeless Plant a Massive Organic Rooftop Garden in Atlanta, GA, Then Use it to Feed an Entire Shelter

Vancouver’s famous Aquarium wants to mix conservation with commercial aquaculture

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

rockfish
A black rockfish swims by inside tank at Vancouver Aquarium. The aquarium’s proposal to produce them commercially has met with some controversy. Photograph by: Mark van Manen, Vancouver Sun

Proposal would produce sustainable rockfish and wolf eels for seafood market

By Larry Pynn
Vancouver Sun
September 4, 2015

Excerpts:

As evidence of the money potentially at stake, T & T Supermarket in Vancouver’s Chinatown this week had live rockfish for sale $21.99 a pound, and live “rice field eel” (a species not threatened) for $20.99 — both well above live lobster at $15.99.

The aquarium has been breeding fish for about 45 years but has been more aggressively pursuing commercial aquaculture since the arrival of Shannon Balfry as director of aquatic animal breeding program about three years ago. “We have the ability to do it so why wouldn’t we do it?” says the PhD graduate from the University of B.C. “Nobody else is going to take that ball and run with it. We can do the ground work.”

[Read more →]

September 5, 2015   Comments Off on Vancouver’s famous Aquarium wants to mix conservation with commercial aquaculture

The Atlantic: A green, neatly trimmed symbol of the American dream has outlived its purpose

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someoneShare on Google+

lawnturf

“We’re in a new era,” Governor Jerry Brown explained. “The idea of nicely green grass fed by water every day—that’s going to be a thing of the past.”

By Megan Garber
The Atlantic
Aug 30, 2015

Excerpt:

California, drought notwithstanding, remained home to stretches of imported greenery—around homes, around malls, atop golf courses dotting the desert with their false oases.

A2005 NASA study derived from satellite imaging—the most recent such study available—found that turf grasses took up nearly 2 percent of the entire surface of the continental U.S. And that was including the vast stretches of land that remained undeveloped.

[Read more →]

September 5, 2015   Comments Off on The Atlantic: A green, neatly trimmed symbol of the American dream has outlived its purpose