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FoodChain in Lexington, Kentucky, provides education and hands-on training for indoor sustainable food production and processing

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Rebecca Self of FoodChain, an urban agriculture nonprofit, posed with greens being grown along with tilapia fish in an aquaponics system. The greens and fish are sold to restaurants. By Tom Eblen.

Since September 2013, FoodChain has been producing about 30 pounds of greens and a dozen tilapia each week.

By Tom Eblan
Kentucky.com
September 20, 2015

Excerpt:

The fish and most of the greens are bought by Smithtown Seafood. Blue Moon Farm distributes excess greens to other restaurants.

The aquaponics system works like this: waste grain from the brewery is fed to the fish, whose waste water provides the nutrients for lettuce and other greens to be grown under energy-efficient indoor lighting.

“You would never pinpoint this as a place to grow food,” Self said of the once-abandoned building. “But it’s actually a perfect fit.”

Sales of greens and fish have covered about 35 percent of FoodChain’s $100,000 annual budget, and virtually all of the cost of producing them, Self said. Funding for educational programs comes from donations and foundation grants.

Read the complete article here.