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Relocating a community garden after supermarket closes in Atlanta, Georgia

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Volunteers pose after working to move supplies from the community garden’s old location in the parking lot of the now-closed Super Giant Foods. The garden is being rebuilt at 1225 Donald Lee Hollowell Parkway.

Emory Urban Health Initiative volunteers rally to relocate community garden

By Kimber Williams
Emory Report
March 15, 2016

Excerpt:

When the Emory Urban Health Initiative (UHI) first helped an organic community teaching garden take root in the parking lot of the Super Giant Foods grocery store in Northwest Atlanta’s Bankhead neighborhood, the goal was to tackle issues of food access and poverty where they lived.

By all measures, the project has succeeded — drawing local residents and community partners to help teach gardening, cooking and nutrition classes while growing fresh produce that has been provided at no cost to residents of an area that, if not strictly a food desert, suffered from limited grocery options.

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March 22, 2016   Comments Off on Relocating a community garden after supermarket closes in Atlanta, Georgia

Community gardens are scarce in Burnaby and Surrey, British Columbia, report says

rnsuurSee video online.

Surrey Councillor Mike Starchuk, who chairs the agricultural committee, said conditions in Vancouver are much different.

By Kent Spencer
Vancouver Sun
March 22, 2016

Excerpt:

The study reported that Burnaby and Surrey have six community gardens apiece on civic land, while Vancouver has 45.

“Other cities don’t like to be compared to Vancouver. They think it makes them look bad,” said Rice. “Surrey doesn’t have anywhere near enough community gardens for its size. Burnaby has also lagged.”

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March 22, 2016   Comments Off on Community gardens are scarce in Burnaby and Surrey, British Columbia, report says

San Antonio permits urban farmers to grow and sell their yield

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“The best thing is that you can grow and sell at your own home without getting a permit,” she said.

By Matt Stieb
San Antonio Standard
March 16, 2016

Excerpt:

As a large and sprawling city, San Antonio has a wealth of underutilized land: alleyways, rooftops and thin strips between fences that have never been looked at as an outlet for beauty or revenue. But, as of 2016, City Council has approved these lots for new growth as micro-agricultural spaces. In a December 2015 amendment to the city’s Unified Development Code, gardeners and urban farmers will be able to grow and sell their yield from almost any lot in the city.

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March 22, 2016   Comments Off on San Antonio permits urban farmers to grow and sell their yield