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10 lessons for gardeners from MUSC’s urban patch of fruits, veggies in Charleston, South Carolina

mscThe MUSC Urban Farm is on a half-acre in the middle of the city. Photograph by Ferris Kaplan.

What you might not expect is that this farm is tucked in the middle of the MUSC-Medical University of South Carolina campus in downtown Charleston.

By Helen Mitternight
The Post and Courier
April 2, 2016

Excerpt:

Grow what you love but have backups.

Ketron says she regularly polls volunteers to find out what kinds of vegetables they want to eat.

“Having such an international population on campus, we plant a lot of what people miss from home. So we have Asian cabbage, herbs used in Indian cooking, French mache lettuce,” she says. “We have a lot of funky, weird stuff you can’t find at the grocery. But we also go with a lot of standards, although they may be funky standards like purple carrots or purple sweet potatoes. We get a lot of young kids and you want their introduction to vegetables to be comfortable, so we have carrots, radishes.

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April 9, 2016   Comments Off on 10 lessons for gardeners from MUSC’s urban patch of fruits, veggies in Charleston, South Carolina

Confronting the Dark Side of Urban Agriculture

francFrancois Manchebo.

All urban agricultures are not sustainable, and some may even produce deleterious effects on the city inhabitants as well as on the city itself.

By François Mancebo, PhD,
Director of the IRCS and IATEUR, is professor of urban planning and sustainability at Rheims university. He lives in Paris.
The Nature of Cities
April 8, 2016

Excerpt:

Get back to the ground level: conventional farming within cities is potentially a much graver concern, be it located in a skyscraper or just in the ground. The big issue here is the dissemination of pesticides and fertilizers as well as of the wastes and the by-products of industrial urban agriculture, especially in vine-growing or grain-growing regions—two agricultural productions with high added-value—where vines and fields are frequently incorporated in the city. The inhabitants of such cities are exposed to critical levels of pesticides on a daily basis without them even knowing. Well, they are beginning to know, and it appears that they are not happy at all.

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April 9, 2016   Comments Off on Confronting the Dark Side of Urban Agriculture

Greater Cape Town, South Africa to develop 280ha of fertile urban farmland with more than 6 000 houses

grphoilFarm workers in the Philippi Horticultrural Area pick vegetables to be sold at local supermarkets and informal trade vegetable stalls. It is feared at least 4 000 could lose their jobs if development plans for the area go ahead. Pictures: Michael Walker.

The area had been producing vegetables for the city since 1885 and he warned that the short-term profit for a few developers would have a negative effect on the long-term benefit of food, water and climate security offered by the aquifer.

By Asanda Sokanyile
Weekend Argus
Apr 2, 2016

Excerpt:

The consequence, campaign convener Nazeer Sonday warned, would be loss of production of more than

150 000 tons of vegetables and flowers annually, along with as many as 4 000 jobs.

“The land was bought from private farmers by developers who are now waiting for the city to rezone it to allow them to build their estate, which will not only take away the jobs of more than 4 000 farmworkers, but will also ruin the aquifer which could supply the city with almost a third of its potable water needs,” he said.

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April 9, 2016   Comments Off on Greater Cape Town, South Africa to develop 280ha of fertile urban farmland with more than 6 000 houses