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Ikea’s Clever Kit Makes Indoor Farming as Easy as It’ll Get

ikeas
The Krydda/Växer line are the result of some dovetailing trends: (1) More people live in urban areas in small apartments and (2) more and more, people like to know where their food comes from.

60 percent of survey participants grew plants indoors, be they vegetables or flowers. Gardening was more common in Shanghai, where the number is 75 percent.

By Margaret Rhodes
Wired
05.20.16

Excerpt:

It’s no surprise, then, that Shanghai is where Ronnie Runesson, a senior product developer at Ikea, came up with the company’s new line of indoor gardening kits. Runesson, who is Swedish and has worked at Ikea for 33 years, recently spent three years in the company’s Shanghai office. While in Shanghai he visited with other product suppliers, and saw several small, indoor units where office workers grew their own lettuces and herbs.

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May 25, 2016   Comments Off on Ikea’s Clever Kit Makes Indoor Farming as Easy as It’ll Get

Virginia State University Harding Street Urban Agriculture Center uses cutting-edge technology to grow fish, vegetables

vsu

Urban Agriculture Center received a $1.5 million federal grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

By Malik Russell
Virginia Free Press
5/20/2016

Excerpt:

According to Duron Chavis, the center’s project director and a VSU graduate, the center combines hydroponics, where vegetables are grown in water rather than soil, and aquaponics, where fish are grown in small tanks, in a way that allows the fish waste to work as fertilizer for the plants, which in turn, filter the water.

“Basically, we’re trying to multiply how much food you can grow (in a small space) by two, three, four or five times, while at the same time conserving water and energy,” Mr. Chavis told the Free Press.

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May 25, 2016   Comments Off on Virginia State University Harding Street Urban Agriculture Center uses cutting-edge technology to grow fish, vegetables

Newsweek: City Bees Feed On Flowers, Not Junk Food

bbeUrban bees feed entirely on flowers when given the chance and eschew human food. Photo Lauren Nichols.

“There’s no evidence that bee colonies were feeding on human food at all,” Penick says.

By Douglas Main
Newsweek
5/19/16

Excerpt:

In the paper, published May 17 in the Journal of Urban Ecology, the scientists looked at the molecular structure of honey produced by the bees. Honey produced from flowering plants has a specific isotope, or form, of carbon. Honey made from sugary human food, ultimately derived from grasses like sugarcane and corn, however, has a different isotope. Using this distinguishing feature, the researchers were able to confirm that honey produced by rural and urban feral bees came from natural flowering plants and not human-obtained sugars.

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May 25, 2016   Comments Off on Newsweek: City Bees Feed On Flowers, Not Junk Food