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Cotswold Club 1944 – Growing their own, the Village Produce Association during WW2

Rare 12 minute film.

There’s even a role for the children in bringing up the rabbits for food too!

Director: Charles de Lautour
United Kingdom 1944
Strand Film Company
Ministry of Information for Ministry of Agriculture
Donald Taylor, Edgar Anstey

If you can’t buy it, why not grow it yourself? If you’ve too much, then why not sell at the village produce stall? With WWII in full swing and many foods rationed, the Village Produce Association comes into its own in this film shot in the Cotswold village of Somerton, Oxfordshire.

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June 6, 2016   Comments Off on Cotswold Club 1944 – Growing their own, the Village Produce Association during WW2

Florida Lawns Are Being Transformed Into Edible Farms

flee

The popular Fleet Farming program that converts under-used yards could be coming to a garden near you soon.

By Dominique Mosbergen
Senior Writer, The Huffington Post
June 1, 2016

Excerpt:

Row upon neat row of tomatoes, carrots, sweet lettuce and arugula are growing in the front yard of his home in Orlando, Florida.

“I just think that the whole idea of lawns, especially in a place like Florida, is absurd,” Henderson told NPR this month. “Once you get to the point where you realize that you can eat your lawn, I think it makes a whole lot of sense.”

Henderson’s yard wasn’t always so edible.

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June 6, 2016   Comments Off on Florida Lawns Are Being Transformed Into Edible Farms

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan to offer tax break to grow food on vacant lots

gorde“The more food we can grow in Saskatoon, the more healthy we’ll all be,” says Gord Enns, executive director of the Saskatoon Food Council. Liam Richards / Saskatoon Starphoenix

Equal to 50 per cent of the annual property taxes on a vacant lot, but no more than $500 a year for residential sites and $1,200 a year for non-residential properties.

By Phil Tank
Saskatoon Starphoenix
June 1, 2016

Excerpt:

Grant to grow

Here’s how the City of Saskatoon proposes to encourage vacant lot owners to convert them to gardens for up to five years:

The goal: To increase food security in Saskatoon.

The grant: Equal to 50 per cent of the annual property taxes on a vacant lot, but no more than $500 a year for residential sites and $1,200 a year for non-residential properties.

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June 6, 2016   Comments Off on Saskatoon, Saskatchewan to offer tax break to grow food on vacant lots