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Economic crisis bares hunger problem in Venezuela – some turn to urban farming

vencookIn this June 1, 2016 photo, Petra Lezama prepares a salad with vegetables from her roof garden, where she keeps a photo of Venezuela’s late President Hugo Chavez in Caracas, Venezuela. Lezama and her husband Francisco are government supporters who have turned to urban gardening to keep fresh vegetables in their diets, as fresh produce has become an unaffordable luxury for many. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano) See more photos in Daily Mail.

Francisco Salazar, head of a community council that works in Caracas slums, says he and his neighbors are growing beets, black beans, lettuce and dozens of other vegetables in a large community garden.

By Fabiola Sanchez
Associated Press
July 04, 2016

Excerpt:

Some Venezuelans who had given up produce as an unaffordable luxury are now turning to urban farming to get vegetables back into their diets.

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July 5, 2016   Comments Off on Economic crisis bares hunger problem in Venezuela – some turn to urban farming

Fast-Food Chains Are Getting Into Farming Their Own Produce


B.Good Got A Farm! And It’s On An Island!

B.Good, in Boston, is embarking on a new experiment in hyperlocal sourcing.

By Adele Peters
Fast Co-Exist
06.30.16

Excerpt:

They began growing kale in an unused alley next to a restaurant. In 2015, they started buying kale from an urban farmer using a hydroponic shipping container in Boston, and then began operating their own kale-filled shipping container under a local highway.

The island farm seemed like a natural next step. The island has an unusual history; for years, it served as the site of homeless shelters, and a farm next to the shelters helped feed residents and doubled as a job training program. But when the rickety bridge leading from Boston to the island was declared unsafe and demolished in 2014, the farm and shelters were abandoned.

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July 5, 2016   Comments Off on Fast-Food Chains Are Getting Into Farming Their Own Produce

Drip Irrigation, Mulching and Ramial Chipped Wood

mulc
Mulching with plastic material.

Book titled “Waterless Farming’ looks at these techniques

Waterless Farming
By Francis Freeman
Youcanprint Self-Publishing
(May 23, 2016)

Excerpt:

But what is Ramial Chipped Wood (RCW)? In a nutshell, RCW can be defined a biological agricultural technique directed to enrich and manure the soil, as well as succeed in growing plants without water. To achieve these goals the strategy used is to spread and then mix chopped fresh twigs (from now on also called wood chips or chipped wood) in the soil; this gives rise to a whole series of events, which generate a trophic chain, which in the last analysis consents to obtain such extraordinary results.

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July 5, 2016   Comments Off on Drip Irrigation, Mulching and Ramial Chipped Wood