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Urban farming returning Detroit to its roots, but not without challenges

detrepMichigan Urban Farming Initiative has repurposed some degraded Detroit houses, saving the city money. Co-founder Tyson Gersh says not owning the land he farms is ‘very frustrating.’

Perhaps another strategy would be to organize the city’s urban farmers into a unified voice, since Mr. Gersh admits with a laugh that of the 1,500 urban farms in the city, there are “1,500 different individuals” running them.

By Dave Leblanc
The Globe and Mail
Jul. 07, 2016

Excerpt:

Five years ago, it contained nothing.

Today, after four years of urban farming, the southwest corner of Custer and Brush Streets in Detroit’s North End neighbourhood has become a literal cornucopia. In the past two years, it’s pumped out 400,000 pounds of produce that has fed 2,000 households within two square miles. It has provided valuable volunteer experience for 8,000 local residents who have collectively put in 80,000 hours, which have been valued at $1.8-million (U.S.).

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July 7, 2016   Comments Off on Urban farming returning Detroit to its roots, but not without challenges

Chicago’s ‘Uncommon Ground’, a pioneer, restaurant rooftop food garden

roferlThe organic rooftop farm at Uncommon Ground on Devon Avenue was the first of its kind in 2008. [Zoran Orlic Photography]

In 2007, the Camerons opened a second restaurant in Edgewater at 1401 W. Devon Ave. as a showcase for a first-of-its-kind rooftop farm.

*From two article in DNA Info
By Janet Rausa Fuller
July 1, 2016
By Benjamin Woodard
October 4, 2013

Excerpt:

It all starts in the basement grow room, where seeds are germinated before being moved to the roof in the spring.

“Everything you see here, we started downstairs,” she said. This year, she and her interns have harvested 1,100 pounds of food, including some crops from the restaurant’s Wrigleyville location, she said.

Only a small portion of all of the food the restaurants serve come from its growing operations, Rosenthal said, but many dishes incorporate at least some of the crops, such as fennel, garlic, shallots, potatoes, lettuce, kale, cascade hops and grapes.

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July 7, 2016   Comments Off on Chicago’s ‘Uncommon Ground’, a pioneer, restaurant rooftop food garden