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Korea’s first school to teach farming to retirees who come from cities

koreoldThe first students to enroll in a school that teaches farming to retirees from urban areas pose in front of their dormitory in Yeongju, North Gyeongsang. [GONG JEONG-SIK]

The Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, North Gyeongsang Provincial Government and Yeongju City Government spent about 2 billion won ($1.7 million) building the school, which allows retirees to better settle into rural areas.

By Song Yee-Ho
Korea Joining Daily
July 16, 2016

Excerpt:

The students mostly learn practical agricultural skills such as how to make and manage fertilizers, cultivate farmland and use farming machines. The school also owns small parcels of land where students can practice growing different crops.

The students were also paired up with senior farmers who grow the crops they are interested in growing themselves. They visited their mentor’s farms and also went to historic places such as Buseok Temple.

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July 20, 2016   Comments Off on Korea’s first school to teach farming to retirees who come from cities

Food waste: harvesting Spain’s unwanted crops to feed the hungry

gleanAdvocates of gleaning say that the movement could reduce pressure on land use, improve diets, feed the hungry and provide work for the socially excluded. Photograph: Natalia Lázaro Prevost

Spain’s gleaning movement has grown rapidly in response to austerity, harvesting imperfect fruit and veg – that would otherwise be wasted – for food banks. Now its own line of jams, soups and sauces is taking off too

By Arthur Nelson
The Guardian
July 2016

Excerpt:

A 39-year-old Moroccan emigré with two small children, Abdelouahid began “gleaning” – harvesting farmers’ unwanted crops – with the Espigoladors (gleaners) after losing his job in the construction industry four years ago. It is Ramadan and he is fasting but still smiling as he cuts at the green jewels.

“I don’t like to spend my days at home, sending CVs to employers, waiting for their rejection letters, or going around the restaurants trying to find food,” he says. “I prefer to do something positive. A lot of people need this food. It is better to collect it than to leave it.”

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July 20, 2016   Comments Off on Food waste: harvesting Spain’s unwanted crops to feed the hungry