New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
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Boston Urban Farm that once benefited the homeless now run by fast-food chain

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A tractor and greenhouse are pictured on the farm. Photo Timothy Tai For The Boston Globe.

Before it was abandoned, when hundreds of homeless people, addicts, and troubled teens slept there every night, the island in Boston Harbor had a thriving farm that produced thousands of pounds of organically grown vegetables, herbs, eggs, honey, and more.

By David Abel
Boston GLOBE
JULY 25, 2016

Excerpt:

Company officials also said they intend to grow the produce most used at their restaurants — some 40,000 pounds of kale, beets, cabbage, and other vegetables — rather than basing their choice of crops on the community’s needs.

“It’s heartbreaking what’s happening,” said Elissa Nabozny, a former volunteer on the farm.

Nabozny said she doesn’t understand why the city didn’t allow its employees, or a nonprofit group devoted to the homeless, to use the 2.5 acres of farmland. The farm used to be run by Serving Ourselves, a city job-training program for the homeless that focused on agriculture.

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July 30, 2016   Comments Off on Boston Urban Farm that once benefited the homeless now run by fast-food chain

Halifax: ’A global garden:’ Hope Blooms and Syrian refugees getting their hands dirty, together

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Hope Blooms’ Jessie Jollymore and Tamar Mintis hold a Sidney Crosby autographed game jersey in their north-end Halifax garden on Sunday. They are auctioning off the jersey to help support the community garden for Syrian refugees. JEFF HARPER / METRO

Hockey Player, Sidney Crosby, has even donated a game-worn jersey to help raise money to expand the blossoming north-end location.

By: Rebecca Dingwell
Metro
Jul 24 2016

Excerpt:

“We were already full in the garden, and so a lot of community members gave up their plot so the Syrian families could grow food,” explained Jollymore.

Now, Hope Blooms is looking to get the new Haligonians involved further – but Jollymore said they need more human resources, especially an interpreter. They also want to take down one of the fences to make more room for garden plots.

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July 30, 2016   Comments Off on Halifax: ’A global garden:’ Hope Blooms and Syrian refugees getting their hands dirty, together