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China’s Chengdu farm capitalises on taking rich families back to their roots

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Rick pickings: Sunshine Organic Farm

For the founders of the Sunshine Organic Farm, a working farm and weekend retreat on the city’s south-western outskirts, Chengdu residents’ frustration with urban life presents an opportunity.

By Christian Shepherd
FT.com
Aug. 18, 2016

Excerpt:

Chengdu’s lifestyle is often sold as a relaxed contrast to the crush of China’s east-coast metropolises. Residents like to take it easy. Sleepy tea-houses line the twin rivers that snake through the city and the clack of mah-jong game tiles echoes in back alleys till the early morning.

But as the south-western city grows, the gentle pace of life is under pressure. Once-quiet streets are clogged with traffic. Chengdu is now the most congested city in China and the ninth most congested in the world, according to a recent report by satnav company TomTom. Its once vaunted clean air is also under threat, with the city doing only slightly better than smoggy Beijing in a 2014 air quality ranking of Chinese cities by Greenpeace.

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August 25, 2016   Comments Off on China’s Chengdu farm capitalises on taking rich families back to their roots

Canada’s Environmentalist, David Suzuki: How much food can cities produce?

suzu
David Suzuki is 80 years old. He is a scientist, broadcaster, author, and cofounder of the David Suzuki Foundation.

Cities needn’t be wastelands of car-choked roads and pavement. Incorporating food production into ever-expanding urban areas makes cities more livable and enhances the natural systems that keep us alive and healthy.

By David Suzuki
Georgia Straight
Aug 25, 2016

Excerpt:

It’s still possible to grow a lot of food in urban areas, especially with composting and enriched-soil techniques. Ladner writes that Toronto plans to supply 25 percent of its fruit and vegetable production within city limits by 2025, and a study from Michigan State University concluded that Detroit could grow 70 percent of its vegetables and 40 percent of its fruit on 570 vacant lots covering 5,000 acres of city land.

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August 25, 2016   Comments Off on Canada’s Environmentalist, David Suzuki: How much food can cities produce?

Saskatoon, Canada: Inner city farming has its advantages

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Lisa Taylor weeds her garden near King George school in Riversdale in Saskatoon on July 6, 2016. (Michelle Berg / Saskatoon StarPhoenix)

A diverse assortment of flowers, vegetables and herbs grow past Lisa Taylor’s fence line, right to the sidewalk of her cozy Riversdale home.

By Michelle Berg
Saskatoon StarPhoenix
August 18, 2016

Excerpt:

“By growing food in the city, people in the community experience firsthand what growing food looks like and the work and energy that goes into their food before it ends up on their plate,” she says.

This year she has started a new business called Biodivercity Farms. She and her husband, Jason Fege, find creative ways to use smaller spaces within the city to grow produce that is boxed up and delivered to 23 customers each week of the growing season.

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August 25, 2016   Comments Off on Saskatoon, Canada: Inner city farming has its advantages