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Washington: University of the District of Columbia campus is the largest rooftop farm in the city — 20,000 square fee

sabwash
Dean Sabine O’Hara describes the UDC rooftop farm to Sustainable Urban Agriculture students. Photo (CC BY-SA): Erik Assadourian.

The goal is to build an “Urban Food Hub” in each of the city’s eight wards, particularly the poorer ones.

Future Perfect
Sept 2016

Excerpt:

Right on campus is the largest rooftop farm in the city – 20,000 square feet – growing plump Cherokee Purple heirloom tomatoes and crisp red-stemmed Swiss Chard along the edges (areas of the roof that have the structural integrity to handle larger crops) as well as greens, flowers, and sedum in the interior sections (for insulation and water capture benefits). Much of this rooftop produce – grown mostly by volunteers – gets distributed to UDC’s faculty and staff through a community-supported agriculture program and to D.C. food banks as donations.

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September 22, 2016   Comments Off on Washington: University of the District of Columbia campus is the largest rooftop farm in the city — 20,000 square fee

‘FarmHer’ TV Series Features Austin Texas, Urban Farmer, Carol Ann Sayle

According to the USDA’s most recent census report, the number of women-led farms has tripled over the past four decades and remains one of the fastest-growing groups in the United States.

Photographer and TV host Marji Guyler-Alaniz
RFD-TV’s new series, “FarmHer”

Marji met up with Carol Ann Sayle and her husband Larry at Boggy Creek Farm in Austin, Texas, where they run one of the oldest urban farms in the country. Decades ago this couple — an artist and real estate professional — combined their love of gardening and some good business sense to create their 15-acre urban farm.

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September 22, 2016   Comments Off on ‘FarmHer’ TV Series Features Austin Texas, Urban Farmer, Carol Ann Sayle

Grubbly Farms is raising black soldier flies as a substitute for wild-caught fish in food for livestock and farmed seafood

grubby
A 5500 sq ft facility just outside of Atlanta.

By feeding pre-consumer food waste to insects we can decrease the amount of volume required by landfills as well as reduce our greenhouse gas emissions.

By Alison Moodie
The Guardian
Aug 6, 2016

Excerpt:

Warner and Pittaluga are running their business out of a warehouse in Doraville, Georgia, and they plan to hire their first full-time employee this month. Their initial business involves drying larvae and selling them whole as chicken treats. The farm hopes to generate enough revenue and raise more money to buy equipment for making fish meal, a process that involves extracting oil from dehydrated larvae and then grounding the larvae into a protein powder.

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September 22, 2016   Comments Off on Grubbly Farms is raising black soldier flies as a substitute for wild-caught fish in food for livestock and farmed seafood