New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
Random header image... Refresh for more!

Are Aquaponics a Sustainable Alternative to Conventional Agriculture Methods in New York City?

ednw

Edenworks, an aquaponic farm in East Williamsburg, expects to produce around 150,000 pounds of leafy greens in a 12,000-square-foot space. For reference, Brooklyn Grange, the world’s largest rooftop soil farm operating on two rooftops in Brooklyn, grows about 50,000 pounds of produce in a total of 108,000 square feet. That’s 70 percent more produce in about five percent of the space.

By Emily Payne
New York City Food Policy Centre
Nov 16, 2016

Excerpt:

The Lt. Joseph P Kennedy Community Center Garden, Harlem

Location: The Lt. Joseph P Kennedy Community Center in Harlem, which offers a range of cultural events and educational opportunities in the neighborhood, is home to this agricultural project and science lab.

Size: The rooftop currently boasts 64 square feet of deep water tanks, along with modular vertical gardens producing a number of food plants.

[Read more →]

November 26, 2016   Comments Off on Are Aquaponics a Sustainable Alternative to Conventional Agriculture Methods in New York City?

Speedibin: Metal Compost Bin That Keeps Rodents Out

speed Joyce McMenamon, second generation developer of the Speedibin.

Indiegogo Campaign – Speedibins were first designed by Fred and Peg Francis in 1989

By Joyce McMenamon
Courtenay BC, Canada
Nov. 2016

It is all metal so animals can’t chew through.

A metal mesh screen on the bottom allows worms, microbes and water to transfer but prevents animals from tunneling in.

The large lid comes right off for easy access.

The front door slides out for easy removal of finished compost.

A latching handle keeps out raccoons, dogs and wind.

[Read more →]

November 26, 2016   Comments Off on Speedibin: Metal Compost Bin That Keeps Rodents Out

High-tech agriculture blossoms in the city of St Petersburg, Florida at Brick Street Farms

stp
Owners Bradley Doyle and Shannon O’Malley in front of their Brick Street Farms. Photo by Todd Bates.

In Farm 1, which has a sweet scent and can be as cold as 60 degrees, there’s Red Cross Butterhead, Rex lettuce (an ideal hydroponic similar to butterhead), heirloom Vulcan lettuce (for all you Star Trek fans) and arugula, to name a few.

By Meaghan Habuda
Creative Loafing
Nov 18, 2016

Excerpt:

The indoor hydroponic farm, owned by wife-and-husband duo Shannon O’Malley and Bradley Doyle, doesn’t look like much from the outside. But spread out over green upcycled freight containers, planted inside a wooden fence that surrounds the former site of an abandoned junkyard at 2001 Second Ave. S., Brick Street has spent close to a year quietly blossoming in St. Petersburg.

What makes up this city farm’s local, vertically grown bounty? Herbs and leafy greens.

[Read more →]

November 26, 2016   Comments Off on High-tech agriculture blossoms in the city of St Petersburg, Florida at Brick Street Farms