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Knoxville, Tennessee gives urban agriculture the green thumb


Abbey Farms owner discusses community-supported agriculture production Cortney Roark/News Sentinel.

Aisenbrey said “farming is the new golf,” and hopes to continue to see a change in the way people view food through urban agriculture.

By Cortney Roark
Knoxville News Sentinel
December 5, 2016

Excerpt:

“Our goal with the pilot program is for people that don’t have access to land to be able to grow food on city-owned land,” said Brian Blackmon, Office of Sustainability project manager. “This really builds on a long-term vision of how we enable people who don’t have their own area to grow their own food for personal consumption to get access to an area.”

City land would host community gardens, which are gardens managed and maintained by a nonprofit organization or group of people to grow and harvest food for their own consumption. The pilot will help combat the fact that 11.26 percent of Knoxville’s households are located in food deserts or areas where there are few or no healthy food options, according to the city’s urban agriculture zoning ordinance.

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December 11, 2016   Comments Off on Knoxville, Tennessee gives urban agriculture the green thumb

Toronto: FoodShare’s horticultural therapy program at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health gets to the root of things

foodsh
Jamie works in the garden behind CAMH’s Queen West location. Photo by Michelle Da Silva.

Food and mental health grow together at CAMH’s Sunshine Garden

By Michelle Da Silva
Now
Sept 20, 2016

Excerpt:

In Canada, horticultural therapy has been popular for decades. The Canadian Horticultural Therapy Association was formed in the 1980s and now has nearly 200 members. According to the CHTA, gardening therapy is used in a variety of settings beyond facilities like CAMH, including nursing homes, rehabilitation centres and correctional facilities.

Phyllis Wong, an occupational therapist who runs an in-patient anxiety unit at CAMH, has recommended clients to the Sunshine Garden program. She says horticultural therapy is effective, depending on a client’s readiness, because it engages the whole person – seeing, being and doing.

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December 11, 2016   Comments Off on Toronto: FoodShare’s horticultural therapy program at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health gets to the root of things

Could 3D printing technology be used as a solution to global food crises?


Top 5 3D Food Printers.

“Considering that one third of food produced worldwide for human consumption (a staggering 1.3 billion tonnes) is thrown away each year, 3D food printing which involves the deposition of materials only where needed and on demand, could also contribute to curbing food wastage, while bringing high-tech, substantial meals to more people,”

From The Asian Food Journal
and 3D Printing.com

Excerpt:

3D food printing is essentially about using food ingredients and shaping them into a form. The configuration is set with the help of the printer’s 3D modeling program. The process, also known as additive manufacturing, involves the repeated layering of viscous ingredients as varied as vegetables and meat, to cheeses and dough, to eventually form solid comestibles, all based on information fed into the 3D printer from an SD card or computer. Today’s 3D printed edibles defy common perceptions of being merely aesthetic creations – they increasingly offer novel solutions to pertinent food concerns.

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December 11, 2016   Comments Off on Could 3D printing technology be used as a solution to global food crises?