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In Urban Edmunston, Maryland, Eco City Farms Grows Enough Produce to Feed 250 People Each Year


Video by Deborah Levenson.

The federal government has declared Prince Georges County, Md. a “food desert” because many residents have trouble getting to grocery stores that sell fresh fruits and vegetables.

Excerpt from ECO City Farm’s website:

ECO City Farms has converted previously vacant land into a highly productive farming enterprise that produces healthy vegetables, fruit, herbs, eggs and honey. Our produce is Certified Naturally Grown by fellow farmers who establishes an international grassroots alternative to the USDA Certified Organic Program. We employ environmentally sound, chemical-free, permaculture farming methods and support others to do the same.

Farmer Training:

We provide in-depth, hands-on technical and practical training in urban agriculture through apprenticeships and internships and courses. In conjunction with Prince George’s Community College and other partners, we offer a wide range of Continuing Education Credit courses and a certificate in Commercial Urban Farming. Students range from beginners to seasoned experts.

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December 24, 2016   Comments Off on In Urban Edmunston, Maryland, Eco City Farms Grows Enough Produce to Feed 250 People Each Year

San Jose Council Drops Steep Fee to Encourage Urban Agriculture


Urban agriculture advocates scored a big victory at Tuesday’s City Council meeting. (Photo courtesy of Valley Verde)

San Jose City Council backed off a proposed $1,540 fee that could have left green-thumb dreams dying on the vine.

By Chuck Carroll
SanJose Inside
Dec 16, 2016

Excerpt:

Last month, community groups were elated to learn the council would grant owners of blighted vacant lots a significant property tax break for converting parcels into small-scale farms for five years. But then the city decided to charge owners a $1,540 fee to apply for the tax break.

Jamie Chen, an organizing manager of Sacred Heart Community Service’s La Mesa Verde program, which promotes organic gardening in low-income areas, has worked for two years to push through the policy. She said she was “flabbergasted at how they came to such a high fee.” On Tuesday, Chen and more than a dozen other speakers begged the council to reduce or drop the fee altogether. They pointed to San Francisco and Sacramento as places that don’t charge any fees.

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December 24, 2016   Comments Off on San Jose Council Drops Steep Fee to Encourage Urban Agriculture