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California farmers fear foreign workers will be deported

Trump’s remarks were felt sharply in California, which produces nearly half the country’s fruits, vegetables and nuts valued of $47 billion annually.

By Scott Smith
Associated Press
Jan 5, 2017

Excerpts:

Roughly 325,000 workers in California do the back-breaking jobs that farmers say nobody else will do, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Manuel Cunha Jr., president of the Nisei Farmers League farming association, estimates 85 percent of California farmworkers live in the United States illegally.

Leticia Alfaro, a food-safety supervisor at the farm, said in an interview that many of her friends who work in the fields don’t have proper documentation like her, and they take Trump’s threats seriously.

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January 5, 2017   Comments Off on California farmers fear foreign workers will be deported

Cégep du Vieux Montréal built a rooftop garden oasis

A cement terrace in the middle of the city attracts environmentally conscious students and staff

By Verity Stevenson
MacLeans
January 4, 2017

Excerpt:

Bezançon holds urban agriculture-related workshops during the winter, when there’s no gardening to do, to garner interest in the project and in response to what she says is a growing interest among students to produce their own food. “We eat three or four times a day, so it’s a huge part of our life, and to be able to feed yourself is giving yourself power,” says Bezançon. Student volunteers receive no extra credit for the hours they put in, except for the option of having the commitment mentioned on their report card (most don’t put in the bureaucratic effort to do so).

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January 5, 2017   Comments Off on Cégep du Vieux Montréal built a rooftop garden oasis

Syrian refugees find solace in rooftop garden


‘My spirit is relaxed when I’m out here,’ Fatin Kazzi says of her balcony garden [Olivia Alabaster/Al Jazeera]

Of the one million registered Syrian refugees in tiny Lebanon, 10 percent are considered to be food-secure. Photo By Olivia Alabaster.

By Olivia Alabaster
Aljazeera
Sept 6, 2016

Excerpt:

Beirut – Fatin Kazzi’s sun-drenched balcony garden is a cluster of makeshift planters, some fashioned out of crates or the ends of two-litre plastic water bottles.

Already bursting with strawberries, mint, basil, peppers and celery, the garden is just a month old, but Kazzi – who is living in Beirut as a refugee having fled Aleppo five years ago amid Syria’s civil war – eventually hopes to be able to make her own salad from the vegetables here.

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January 5, 2017   Comments Off on Syrian refugees find solace in rooftop garden