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Sandra Robertson is one of eight Dorothy Richardson award winners

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She joined her parents in the garden at the age of 3; they had fresh produce for meals and “handed some over the fence to the neighbors. There is nothing like a fresh tomato that doesn’t taste like cardboard,”

NeighborWorks America
10/13/2016

Excerpt:

Robertson joined Summer Sprouts, an Ohio State University extension program to support the county’s 250 community gardens and help residents start new ones. In return, she received free seeds and starter plants; other supplies, such as wood for raised beds, was donated from construction sites. “I like to experiment,” says Robertsen. “Some people tell me I can’t do certain things, but I go my own way and it usually works out.”

It certainly has with Ashbury Sprouts. What started out as a venture of Robertson’s, members of the local block club and a few friends now has about 11 regular adult volunteers and 13 youth who grow vegetables such as beans, kale, collard greens and tomatoes.

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January 8, 2017   Comments Off on Sandra Robertson is one of eight Dorothy Richardson award winners

3,800-year-old wetland potato garden found in Canada

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Wapato tubers were a dietary staple among the indigenous people of the Fraser and Columbia rivers — the garden site is in what is now the Katzie First Nation territory

The History Blog
2016-12-31

Excerpt:

The tubers were wild plants, not domesticated, and wapato plants can grow deep underground all on their own. It’s an assemblage of rocks that makes it clear that this site wasn’t just a very prolific wild potato patch, but a cultivated wetland garden ingeniously customized by the indigenous people of the area to enhance harvest yields.

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January 8, 2017   Comments Off on 3,800-year-old wetland potato garden found in Canada

College of DuPage (Illinois) offers new Sustainable Urban Agriculture program

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“People are excited about the whole industry,” Clement said. “Students who complete either their degree or certificate in sustainable urban agriculture are ready to enter the workplace.”

By Jennifer Duda
College of DuPage
Daily Herald
Dec 29, 2016

Excerpt:

The degree requires 66 credits in program requirements and general education coursework, while the certificate requires 28 credits in program requirements and electives.

Eight new courses have been developed specifically for the program: Introduction to Sustainable Urban Agriculture, Principles of Agroecology, Local Foods, Introduction to Composting, Urban Agriculture Issues, Sustainable Vegetable and Herb Production, Business Principles of Sustainable Agriculture, and Hydroponic and Aquaponic Production Systems.

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January 8, 2017   Comments Off on College of DuPage (Illinois) offers new Sustainable Urban Agriculture program