New Stories From 'Urban Agriculture Notes'
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Interdisciplinary University project creates model to predict land use, climate effects and even potential profit of farming in cities

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Volunteers help prepare soil and beds at the Spaces of Opportunity urban farm in Phoenix, Arizona.

The model will look at what would happen if vacant land in a city were turned into urban farms, which could produce food for the neighbors and help mitigate the urban heat-island effect, in which concrete and asphalt stay warmer overnight, raising temperatures. Conversely, plants and trees allow desert land to cool at night.

By Mary Beth Faller
Arizona State University
Jan 5, 2017

Excerpt:

As Phoenix continues to sprawl toward Tucson, urban planners are working to prevent the entire 100-mile corridor between Arizona’s largest metro areas from becoming nothing but concrete and asphalt.

Unfettered development, experts say, can strain resources and increase temperatures and pollution, setting off a chain reaction of problems for the region and its residents.

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January 12, 2017   Comments Off on Interdisciplinary University project creates model to predict land use, climate effects and even potential profit of farming in cities

Book: Urban Agriculture for Growing City Regions – Connecting Urban-Rural Spheres in Casablanca

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The example of Casablanca, one of the fastest growing cities in North Africa

Edited by Undine Giseke, Maria Gerster-Bentaya, Frank Helten, Matthias Kraume, Dieter Scherer, Guido Spars, Fouad Amraoui, Abdelaziz Adidi, Said Berdouz, Mohemed Chlaida, Majid Mansour, Mohamed Mdafai
Routledge
2015

This book demonstrates how agriculture can play a determining role in sustainable, climate-optimised urban development. Agriculture within urban growth centres today is more than an economic or social left-over or a niche practice. It is instead a complex system that offers multiple potentials for tomorrow’s megacities. Urban open space and agriculture can be connected to productive urban landscapes – this forms new urban-rural linkages in the urban region and helps shape the city. But in order to do this, agriculture has to be seen as an integral part of the urban fabric and it has to be put on the local agenda.

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January 12, 2017   Comments Off on Book: Urban Agriculture for Growing City Regions – Connecting Urban-Rural Spheres in Casablanca

The Next Generation Of Farmers Is Being Trained In New York City High

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Natalie Arroyo is a senior “Aggie,” one of 600 New York City public school students enrolled in a specialized, four-year agriculture program at John Bowne High School in Queens. She plans to become an agriculture educator after college. Photo by Lela Nargi for NPR.

Some 600 of the city’s public school students are enrolled in Bowne’s specialized, four-year agriculture program.

By Lela Nargi
NPR
January 5, 2017

Excerpt:

Like most of their schoolmates, the Aggies follow an ordinary curriculum of English, math and social studies. But they also learn the building blocks of diverse careers in the booming industry of agriculture, which sees almost 60,000 new jobs open up in the U.S. every year, according to the USDA. The Aggies grow crops, care for livestock and learn the rudiments of floriculture, viticulture, aquaculture, biotechnology and entrepreneurship.

While high schools in rural farming areas have long prepared students for these sorts of jobs, they can’t come close to meeting the demand. So some urban public high schools are stepping in to fill the void.

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January 12, 2017   Comments Off on The Next Generation Of Farmers Is Being Trained In New York City High